District Court news

Gisborne Courthouse. File picture by Rebecca Grunwell

A registrar was told to hit the mute switch on the courtroom’s audio-visual system when a woman being sentenced over it, persisted in interjecting.

Arohanui O Te Ao Geldard, 36, had been warned to stay quiet by Judge Haamiora Raumati when she began to yell that she had no remorse for her offending — three assaults on police, possession of a knife in public and possession of cannabis.

Not wanting any further disruption by Geldard, Judge Raumati told the court taker to mute the speaker and continued the sentencing with her silenced.

The judge imposed two months imprisonment.

Judge Raumati said the charges related to disorder on May 25. Approached by police, Geldard threw compact discs at an officer and ran off. Stopped by an officer who gave chase, she was handcuffed, searched, and found to be in possession of a 20cm serrated knife and 1.33 grams of cannabis.

The knife had been tucked into her skirt.

While being transported to the police station, Geldard kicked the officer who was driving in the tricep. She abused police at the station and bit a constable on the hand. Fortunately, he was wearing rubber gloves and was not injured, the judge said.

Counsel Jonathan Natusch said at no time did Geldard point or attempt to use the knife.

The judge noted Geldard failed to take an opportunity to proffer an address for an electronically-monitored sentence. Imprisonment was the only appropriate alternative option. She had already been on remand in custody for 10 days.

She had not been convicted of any offence since 2013 but had prior convictions for cannabis offending, assault and assault with a weapon.

The sentence included a discount for Geldard’s guilty pleas.

~

A man’s progress towards turning away from crime was sufficient for the court to impose supervision, the judge said.

Blair Te Pairi, 24, pleaded guilty to burglary of the Roseland Tavern, possession of a knife in public, resisting police, refusing to give a blood specimen, refusing to accompany an officer, careless driving, driving while disqualified for a third or subsequent time, and a breach of release conditions.

He was sentenced to nine months supervision, 60 hours community work, and ordered to make reparation of $600 for an insurance excess relating to the burglary.

Counsel Amanda Courtney said Te Pairi’s pre-sentence report was positive about his progress and insight. He was remorseful and worthy of remaining in the community and making good.

Te Pairi was employed and had a positive reference from his employer, who noted he was a good worker.

Te Pairi told the judge he had stopped consuming alcohol and other drugs and was feeling better for it. He wanted to be a good father and family man.

~

For burglary, obstructing police and breaching bail, which he admitted, John Manawaiti Maaka, 25, was jailed for 15 months with six months release conditions.

The burglary was of a house on May 5 and involved Maaka taking two television sets, an X-Box console, and about a dozen bottles of alcohol.

He was identified through DNA analysis of blood found at the scene.

The obstruction charge arose out of his behaviour in January when police went to his home.

Maaka was aggressive, refused to follow instructions and paced about the property, saying he could do as he pleased because it was his house.

Judge Raumati set a starting point of 18 months for the burglary charge, uplifting it by a month for the obstruction charge and a further two months for Maaka’s prior relevant convictions.

There was a month’s discount for his remorse and potential for rehabilitation and a full 25 percent discount for his guilty pleas.

The judge noted Biddle was convicted for burglary in 2010 and had prior relevant convictions for dishonesty offending and obstruction. He failed to appear in court seven times previously.

Maaka said he was determined to change his life and be a good father.

~

Methamphetamine use was said to be the reason for Louis Graeme Maraki’s offending.

Maraki, 34, horticultural worker, pleaded guilty to burglary of a Salvation Army building and unlawfully taking a vehicle.

He was sentenced to eight months home detention and ordered to pay $309 reparation for a television set and associated equipment he took during the burglary.

Six months post-detention conditions will apply.

Part of the sentence, the equivalent of one month imprisonment, was to cover more than $5500 in outstanding fines, which were wiped.

Judge Raumati noted an earlier pre-sentence report linked Maraki’s offending with his use of methamphetamine. But a more recent report noted his comment he now “hated meth’’ and wanted to change.

Both reports recommended imprisonment, the second only if no suitable address was available for an electronically-monitored sentence.

The burglary charge related to Maraki entering a Salvation Army building, vacant at the time, through a lounge window. Police found his fingerprints on the window. Maraki initially denied the offence.

The unlawful taking charge arose after Maraki and an associate went for a joyride on May 8.

They were stopped after a police pursuit. Maraki initially said he did not realise the car was stolen.

~

For two assaults, each involving his partner, the mother of his young child, Xavier Destre Nepe was convicted and ordered to come up for sentence if called upon within six months.

Court costs of $130 were ordered.

Judge Raumati congratulated Nepe for having done the things discussed with him at a previous appearance, and necessary if a good behaviour bond sentence was to be imposed.

Nepe had found employment, a job he enjoyed, and was providing financially for his family, the court heard.

~

After telling the court she could only afford to make reparation payments of $5 weekly for damage to her landlord’s property, a woman was asked about her budget.

Laighvana Sharon Otter, 23, said that as an invalid beneficiary her income was low.

But when Judge Raumati heard her say $30 weekly went on alcohol, he told her the reparation order would be for no less than $10 weekly.

Otter pleaded guilty to intentional damage, the repair bill for which ran to $4425. Reparation of $1500 was sought for part of that sum not covered by insurance.

Otter also pleaded guilty to assault with a weapon, a rock.

She was sentenced to nine months supervision, 80 hours community work, and ordered to pay the remaining debt for the damages.

A psychologist’s report, ordered ahead of her sentence, would be released to community mental health services.

~

A registrar was told to hit the mute switch on the courtroom’s audio-visual system when a woman being sentenced over it, persisted in interjecting.

Arohanui O Te Ao Geldard, 36, had been warned to stay quiet by Judge Haamiora Raumati when she began to yell that she had no remorse for her offending — three assaults on police, possession of a knife in public and possession of cannabis.

Not wanting any further disruption by Geldard, Judge Raumati told the court taker to mute the speaker and continued the sentencing with her silenced.

The judge imposed two months imprisonment.

Judge Raumati said the charges related to disorder on May 25. Approached by police, Geldard threw compact discs at an officer and ran off. Stopped by an officer who gave chase, she was handcuffed, searched, and found to be in possession of a 20cm serrated knife and 1.33 grams of cannabis.

The knife had been tucked into her skirt.

While being transported to the police station, Geldard kicked the officer who was driving in the tricep. She abused police at the station and bit a constable on the hand. Fortunately, he was wearing rubber gloves and was not injured, the judge said.

Counsel Jonathan Natusch said at no time did Geldard point or attempt to use the knife.

The judge noted Geldard failed to take an opportunity to proffer an address for an electronically-monitored sentence. Imprisonment was the only appropriate alternative option. She had already been on remand in custody for 10 days.

She had not been convicted of any offence since 2013 but had prior convictions for cannabis offending, assault and assault with a weapon.

The sentence included a discount for Geldard’s guilty pleas.

~

A man’s progress towards turning away from crime was sufficient for the court to impose supervision, the judge said.

Blair Te Pairi, 24, pleaded guilty to burglary of the Roseland Tavern, possession of a knife in public, resisting police, refusing to give a blood specimen, refusing to accompany an officer, careless driving, driving while disqualified for a third or subsequent time, and a breach of release conditions.

He was sentenced to nine months supervision, 60 hours community work, and ordered to make reparation of $600 for an insurance excess relating to the burglary.

Counsel Amanda Courtney said Te Pairi’s pre-sentence report was positive about his progress and insight. He was remorseful and worthy of remaining in the community and making good.

Te Pairi was employed and had a positive reference from his employer, who noted he was a good worker.

Te Pairi told the judge he had stopped consuming alcohol and other drugs and was feeling better for it. He wanted to be a good father and family man.

~

For burglary, obstructing police and breaching bail, which he admitted, John Manawaiti Maaka, 25, was jailed for 15 months with six months release conditions.

The burglary was of a house on May 5 and involved Maaka taking two television sets, an X-Box console, and about a dozen bottles of alcohol.

He was identified through DNA analysis of blood found at the scene.

The obstruction charge arose out of his behaviour in January when police went to his home.

Maaka was aggressive, refused to follow instructions and paced about the property, saying he could do as he pleased because it was his house.

Judge Raumati set a starting point of 18 months for the burglary charge, uplifting it by a month for the obstruction charge and a further two months for Maaka’s prior relevant convictions.

There was a month’s discount for his remorse and potential for rehabilitation and a full 25 percent discount for his guilty pleas.

The judge noted Biddle was convicted for burglary in 2010 and had prior relevant convictions for dishonesty offending and obstruction. He failed to appear in court seven times previously.

Maaka said he was determined to change his life and be a good father.

~

Methamphetamine use was said to be the reason for Louis Graeme Maraki’s offending.

Maraki, 34, horticultural worker, pleaded guilty to burglary of a Salvation Army building and unlawfully taking a vehicle.

He was sentenced to eight months home detention and ordered to pay $309 reparation for a television set and associated equipment he took during the burglary.

Six months post-detention conditions will apply.

Part of the sentence, the equivalent of one month imprisonment, was to cover more than $5500 in outstanding fines, which were wiped.

Judge Raumati noted an earlier pre-sentence report linked Maraki’s offending with his use of methamphetamine. But a more recent report noted his comment he now “hated meth’’ and wanted to change.

Both reports recommended imprisonment, the second only if no suitable address was available for an electronically-monitored sentence.

The burglary charge related to Maraki entering a Salvation Army building, vacant at the time, through a lounge window. Police found his fingerprints on the window. Maraki initially denied the offence.

The unlawful taking charge arose after Maraki and an associate went for a joyride on May 8.

They were stopped after a police pursuit. Maraki initially said he did not realise the car was stolen.

~

For two assaults, each involving his partner, the mother of his young child, Xavier Destre Nepe was convicted and ordered to come up for sentence if called upon within six months.

Court costs of $130 were ordered.

Judge Raumati congratulated Nepe for having done the things discussed with him at a previous appearance, and necessary if a good behaviour bond sentence was to be imposed.

Nepe had found employment, a job he enjoyed, and was providing financially for his family, the court heard.

~

After telling the court she could only afford to make reparation payments of $5 weekly for damage to her landlord’s property, a woman was asked about her budget.

Laighvana Sharon Otter, 23, said that as an invalid beneficiary her income was low.

But when Judge Raumati heard her say $30 weekly went on alcohol, he told her the reparation order would be for no less than $10 weekly.

Otter pleaded guilty to intentional damage, the repair bill for which ran to $4425. Reparation of $1500 was sought for part of that sum not covered by insurance.

Otter also pleaded guilty to assault with a weapon, a rock.

She was sentenced to nine months supervision, 80 hours community work, and ordered to pay the remaining debt for the damages.

A psychologist’s report, ordered ahead of her sentence, would be released to community mental health services.

~

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