Sellout crowd scorns weather at R&V

The crowd enjoys Mura Musa. The 15th anniversary Rhythm and Vines music festival was sold out, as were plastic ponchos from Gisborne retailers. Festival revellers seemed to enjoy the rain and muddy tracks, with the sunshine expected to make its full comeback tomorrow. Pictures by Rebecca Grunwell
Behind these party people some of the 20,000 festival-goers dance and chant in front of the Vines Stage that yesterday hosted acts like New Zealand performers SWIDT and Sachi, Guernsey-born electronic artist Mura Masa and Los Angeles rapper Schoolboy Q. Festival founder Hamish Pinkham could not be more pleased.
“The site is looking fantastic and festival-goers are in great spirits and ready to enjoy the coming days, mud and all.”
DANCE, WAVE YOUR ARMS, REHYDRATE: A close-packed, happy crowd in front of the Vines Stage at the Rhythm and Vines music festival heaves and pump the air to electronic dance music generated by acts such as Mura Masa.
Pictures by Rebecca Grunwell
The crowd gets pumping to School Boy Q.
Happy campers.
Rhythm and Vines
School Boy Q in action.
School Boy Q lets loose some more expletives.
Rhythm and Vines
Cellar Stage.
Mura Musa
Rhythm and Vines
Cellar Stage.
More happy campers.
Rhythm and Vines
Some of those ponchos get put to use.
Fun in the rain.
Rhythm and Vines. Nothing to say about this one.
Rhythm and Vines
Sachi warms up the crowd.
File picture
Rhythm and Vines
Rhythm and Vines
Rhythm and Vines

ORGAN-pulverising bass beats from hip-hop artist Schoolboy Q’s headline act on the main stage had a packed crowd heaving and chanting on the first night of the Rhythm and Vines festival last night.

The sold-out 15th anniversary Rhythm and Vines festival attracted 20,000 party people, including 12,300 campers.

Rain turned the tracks to the festival’s stages to mud but only seemed to add to the joyous spirit of the event.

Onehunga hip-hop collective SWIDT (See What I Did There?) and two 18-year-old Auckland producers known as Sachi set the tone for the evening with their performances on Vines stage.

Guernsey-born electronic music producer and grammy-nominated Mura Masa played multiple instruments and filled the Vines stage with percussive soundscapes. But the most anticipated act was Schoolboy Q.

Welcomed to Gisborne with a powhiri at the airport in the afternoon, the Los Angeles hip-hop artist was greeted at Waiohika Estate by French bulldog Kojak. (Schoolboy Q also owns a French bulldog that was famously misplaced by United Airlines this year.)

Schoolboy Q’s menacing beats had the crowd seething and chanting back with compelling tracks such as Gangsta.

At other locations around the R and V site, the new Rhythm Supertop was a powerhouse of EDM (electronic dance music) with sets from Max Key, Set Mo and Tiga.

Dancers revelled in the “Smirnoff Forest”, home to the Cellar Stage, while a sequinned concrete mixer acted as a giant mirrorball.

Comedian Heath Franklin’s alter-ego Chopper entertained people at the new Garden Stage, where alternative act High Hoops performed later in the evening.

Among those watching High Hoops’ performance was Balu Brigada bass player and vocalist Guy Harrison.

R and V was like a massive nightclub, he said. Many of the acts were unknown to a lot of festival-goers but it hardly mattered.

“Most people here are about 18. It’s about going with your friends on a long road trip. It’s about the energy and the dancing, and going crazy.

“It’s about having a good time.”

Balu Brigada perform on the Garden Stage tonight at 9.45pm.

The much-anticipated rapper, actor and comedian Big Shaq was rescheduled from last night and will perform at 7.20pm tonight on the Vines Stage.

ORGAN-pulverising bass beats from hip-hop artist Schoolboy Q’s headline act on the main stage had a packed crowd heaving and chanting on the first night of the Rhythm and Vines festival last night.

The sold-out 15th anniversary Rhythm and Vines festival attracted 20,000 party people, including 12,300 campers.

Rain turned the tracks to the festival’s stages to mud but only seemed to add to the joyous spirit of the event.

Onehunga hip-hop collective SWIDT (See What I Did There?) and two 18-year-old Auckland producers known as Sachi set the tone for the evening with their performances on Vines stage.

Guernsey-born electronic music producer and grammy-nominated Mura Masa played multiple instruments and filled the Vines stage with percussive soundscapes. But the most anticipated act was Schoolboy Q.

Welcomed to Gisborne with a powhiri at the airport in the afternoon, the Los Angeles hip-hop artist was greeted at Waiohika Estate by French bulldog Kojak. (Schoolboy Q also owns a French bulldog that was famously misplaced by United Airlines this year.)

Schoolboy Q’s menacing beats had the crowd seething and chanting back with compelling tracks such as Gangsta.

At other locations around the R and V site, the new Rhythm Supertop was a powerhouse of EDM (electronic dance music) with sets from Max Key, Set Mo and Tiga.

Dancers revelled in the “Smirnoff Forest”, home to the Cellar Stage, while a sequinned concrete mixer acted as a giant mirrorball.

Comedian Heath Franklin’s alter-ego Chopper entertained people at the new Garden Stage, where alternative act High Hoops performed later in the evening.

Among those watching High Hoops’ performance was Balu Brigada bass player and vocalist Guy Harrison.

R and V was like a massive nightclub, he said. Many of the acts were unknown to a lot of festival-goers but it hardly mattered.

“Most people here are about 18. It’s about going with your friends on a long road trip. It’s about the energy and the dancing, and going crazy.

“It’s about having a good time.”

Balu Brigada perform on the Garden Stage tonight at 9.45pm.

The much-anticipated rapper, actor and comedian Big Shaq was rescheduled from last night and will perform at 7.20pm tonight on the Vines Stage.

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