Former Wairoa woman recognised in NZOM

HONOURED: Former Wairoa woman Pania Tyson-Nathan was made a member of the New Zealand Order of Merit in the New Year Honours List. Picture supplied

A FORMER Wairoa woman was made a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit in the New Year Honours List.
Pania Tyson-Nathan was recognised for services to Maori and business.

Mrs Tyson-Nathan is chief executive of New Zealand Maori Tourism (NZMT) and has contributed to Maori economic development across business and government sectors.

She is originally from Mahia and is the daughter of the late Girlie Wairau and Winter Tyson, and the granddaughter of Sam Wairau and Mereaira Te Ngaio.

She has been described as one of the most powerful and influential Maori wahine in the business industry.

Mrs Tyson-Nathan (Rongomaiwahine, Ngati Kahungunu and Ngati Porou) is based in Wellington.

Chief executive since 2008

She has led New Zealand Maori Tourism as chief executive since 2008, working to transform the stereotypical entertainment concept of Maori culture for visitors, focusing on a deeper cultural understanding and a broader range of Maori tourism experiences, and building a strong commercial and cultural leadership in the sector.

She is a member of the Maori Economic Development Board, Ministerial Advisory Group on Trade and New Zealand Film Commission Board.

In 2016, she was appointed to the Kahungunu Asset Holding Company Board of Directors.

She has previously been director of the APEC Business Coalition in the lead-up to and following New Zealand’s hosting of APEC in 1999, and was the New Zealand focal point for the Women’s Leaders Network until 2005.

Mrs Tyson-Nathan has worked on fundraising activities for many years with particular focus on the 28 Maori Battalion.

She is married to Evan Nathan and between them they have eight children.

Mrs Tyson-Nathan returns home to Mahia regularly including spending Christmas with her family at Mahia.

— Wairoa Star

A FORMER Wairoa woman was made a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit in the New Year Honours List.
Pania Tyson-Nathan was recognised for services to Maori and business.

Mrs Tyson-Nathan is chief executive of New Zealand Maori Tourism (NZMT) and has contributed to Maori economic development across business and government sectors.

She is originally from Mahia and is the daughter of the late Girlie Wairau and Winter Tyson, and the granddaughter of Sam Wairau and Mereaira Te Ngaio.

She has been described as one of the most powerful and influential Maori wahine in the business industry.

Mrs Tyson-Nathan (Rongomaiwahine, Ngati Kahungunu and Ngati Porou) is based in Wellington.

Chief executive since 2008

She has led New Zealand Maori Tourism as chief executive since 2008, working to transform the stereotypical entertainment concept of Maori culture for visitors, focusing on a deeper cultural understanding and a broader range of Maori tourism experiences, and building a strong commercial and cultural leadership in the sector.

She is a member of the Maori Economic Development Board, Ministerial Advisory Group on Trade and New Zealand Film Commission Board.

In 2016, she was appointed to the Kahungunu Asset Holding Company Board of Directors.

She has previously been director of the APEC Business Coalition in the lead-up to and following New Zealand’s hosting of APEC in 1999, and was the New Zealand focal point for the Women’s Leaders Network until 2005.

Mrs Tyson-Nathan has worked on fundraising activities for many years with particular focus on the 28 Maori Battalion.

She is married to Evan Nathan and between them they have eight children.

Mrs Tyson-Nathan returns home to Mahia regularly including spending Christmas with her family at Mahia.

— Wairoa Star

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