Bring back paper bags?

Mayor poses the public a question.

Mayor poses the public a question.

TO BRING BACK OR NOT TO BRING BACK: That is the question Mayor Meng Foon is asking the community on Facebook . . . to consider whether paper rubbish bags should be re-introduced. “The way it used to be could be the future.’’ He sees pros and cons in the idea. Pictures by Liam Clayton
Mayor Meng Foon with paper rubbish bags.

MAYOR Mayor Meng Foon is having another “public chat” — this time asking the community on Facebook whether Gisborne District Council should bring back paper rubbish bags.

There has been some positive feedback to Mr Foon’s idea but, as he has noticed, there is stronger support for the introduction of wheelie bins.

Mr Foon told The Herald he was “just thinking and putting it out there”.

“The way it used to be could be the future.

“Let’s have a public chat on Facebook.”

Mr Foon has down-loaded a photo of old Gisborne District Council rubbish bags on Facebook with the comments:

“This was the GDC official rubbish bag. Shall we go back to this?

“No stickers.

“Just pay for bags through rates.

“If you need more, buy them at shops.

“What are you thinking?”

Back to the past?

Mr Foon said he started thinking about the issue when he found some of the old rubbish bags at home.

They were used in the 1980s and 1990s and were later replaced by plastic bags.

“We had paper bags and a bundle of about 20 were dropped off at the gate.

“We filled them with rubbish and left them at the gate, where the truck would pick them up.

“There was no recycling in those days.

“But there was a jumbo bin at the Makaraka lay-by information centre (near his home) and some would take their bigger rubbish stuff there.”

Mr Foon said the old rubbish bags still looked strong, but he had been thinking about “the pros and cons”.

Plastic bags were all-weather but did not degrade like paper bags.

Paper ripped in the wet but were better for the environment.

Paper bags were dearer than plastic and harder to seal.

“I hear British Prime Minister Theresa May is supporting plastic-free supermarket aisles.”

Last week, Mrs May announced Britain would eradicate avoidable plastic waste in the next quarter-century.

The policy includes extending a 5p charge for a single-use plastic bag to all retailers and introducing packaging-free aisles in supermarkets.

(The European Parliament has since argued Mrs May’s policy of mandatory fees for plastic bags is actually a European Union regulation.)

'Yes, let's go back' say some

Comments supportive of Mr Foon’s proposal include the likes of “yes, go back”, “makes more sense” and “so easy.”

Several people commenting on the rubbish bag idea said similar schemes operated successfully in Wellington and Rotorua.

Some said the system would be easier for tenants, as they would not be reliant on landlords providing stickers.

Others expressed concern about the bags withstanding wet weather or dogs.

One person said there had to be a reason why paper bags were replaced.

“Are we about to repeat a past mistake?”

Many respondents suggested wheelie bins, with some people calling for the system of different coloured bins for recyclable rubbish, non-recyclable rubbish and green waste.

The wheelie bin system was described as stronger, easier and more efficient.

Residents from Christchurch and Hawke’s Bay said their communities used wheelie bins and they could not imagine “going back to the way you guys up there do it!”

A couple of people expressed concern about the cost of introducing wheelie bins and trucks with hydraulic lifts.

• Mr Foon has appeared on Facebook before for a “public chat’’, including when he successfully suggested the Taruheru River cycle and walkway should be reconsidered ahead of the proposed alternative route along Aberdeen Road.

MAYOR Mayor Meng Foon is having another “public chat” — this time asking the community on Facebook whether Gisborne District Council should bring back paper rubbish bags.

There has been some positive feedback to Mr Foon’s idea but, as he has noticed, there is stronger support for the introduction of wheelie bins.

Mr Foon told The Herald he was “just thinking and putting it out there”.

“The way it used to be could be the future.

“Let’s have a public chat on Facebook.”

Mr Foon has down-loaded a photo of old Gisborne District Council rubbish bags on Facebook with the comments:

“This was the GDC official rubbish bag. Shall we go back to this?

“No stickers.

“Just pay for bags through rates.

“If you need more, buy them at shops.

“What are you thinking?”

Back to the past?

Mr Foon said he started thinking about the issue when he found some of the old rubbish bags at home.

They were used in the 1980s and 1990s and were later replaced by plastic bags.

“We had paper bags and a bundle of about 20 were dropped off at the gate.

“We filled them with rubbish and left them at the gate, where the truck would pick them up.

“There was no recycling in those days.

“But there was a jumbo bin at the Makaraka lay-by information centre (near his home) and some would take their bigger rubbish stuff there.”

Mr Foon said the old rubbish bags still looked strong, but he had been thinking about “the pros and cons”.

Plastic bags were all-weather but did not degrade like paper bags.

Paper ripped in the wet but were better for the environment.

Paper bags were dearer than plastic and harder to seal.

“I hear British Prime Minister Theresa May is supporting plastic-free supermarket aisles.”

Last week, Mrs May announced Britain would eradicate avoidable plastic waste in the next quarter-century.

The policy includes extending a 5p charge for a single-use plastic bag to all retailers and introducing packaging-free aisles in supermarkets.

(The European Parliament has since argued Mrs May’s policy of mandatory fees for plastic bags is actually a European Union regulation.)

'Yes, let's go back' say some

Comments supportive of Mr Foon’s proposal include the likes of “yes, go back”, “makes more sense” and “so easy.”

Several people commenting on the rubbish bag idea said similar schemes operated successfully in Wellington and Rotorua.

Some said the system would be easier for tenants, as they would not be reliant on landlords providing stickers.

Others expressed concern about the bags withstanding wet weather or dogs.

One person said there had to be a reason why paper bags were replaced.

“Are we about to repeat a past mistake?”

Many respondents suggested wheelie bins, with some people calling for the system of different coloured bins for recyclable rubbish, non-recyclable rubbish and green waste.

The wheelie bin system was described as stronger, easier and more efficient.

Residents from Christchurch and Hawke’s Bay said their communities used wheelie bins and they could not imagine “going back to the way you guys up there do it!”

A couple of people expressed concern about the cost of introducing wheelie bins and trucks with hydraulic lifts.

• Mr Foon has appeared on Facebook before for a “public chat’’, including when he successfully suggested the Taruheru River cycle and walkway should be reconsidered ahead of the proposed alternative route along Aberdeen Road.

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Niggly - 7 months ago
Wheelie bins pleeeaaase. And get manufacturers to use recyclable packaging. You cannot buy anything that isn't plastic-wrapped. Not meat, not veges, not clothing.

G R Webb - 7 months ago
What advantage do wheelie bins give the homeowner, unless you happen to sell them? Just another cost.

Tracey Maree - 7 months ago
Paper rubbish bags fall apart when wet, so not good. Wheelie bins are so much tidier and the rubbish is contained better. Rubbish bags are gross and can sometimes sit all day until collected, causing animals to investigate and spread rubbish.

Deborah - 7 months ago
Wheelie bins, coloured for recycle and refuse, would be good.

Sarah Boyle - 7 months ago
Love the idea of the paper sacks.

Lina - 7 months ago
Wheelie bins, 1 x recycling, 1 x rubbish, 1 x green waste.

Diane Warrington - 7 months ago
Definitely wheelie bins please. Lived in Kawerau for a few years and they work very successfully there. Despite the initial cost, the bins last for a very long time and can be easily sanitised.

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