Log trailer flips on coast highway

CLOSE SHAVE: A trailer loaded with logs tipped over on State Highway 35 this morning between Tokomaru Bay and Tolaga Bay. A driver who came on the scene moments after it happened said he was thankful he had not been closer to the truck. “It was a scary situation.” Picture by Manu Caddie

A LOG truck lost part of its load on State Highway 35 this morning and a driver near to the rig when it happened said it was a “scary situation” and he was glad he was not closer.

The mishap happened at about 6.30am just south of Hikuwai Road, south of Tokomaru Bay, when the truck’s trailer tipped over.

“It looks like the trailer went too far on to the shoulder of the road and flipped,” said Tolaga Bay police officer Senior Constable Richard Reeves.

The driver on the scene moments after it happened, Manu Caddie, said he was glad he was not at that spot a fraction earlier.

“It was obvious the trailer came across on to the opposite side of the road in the crash and there were logs everywhere, mainly in the ditch.

“Fortunately, there was no one going the other way or following too close behind,” Mr Caddie said.

“It was a scary situation.”

One lane of the highway was blocked by the truck and trailer unit. It remained on the road until later this morning when the logging contractor brought in a machine to move it.

Senior Constable Reeves expected both lanes of the road would be open by midday at the latest.

A LOG truck lost part of its load on State Highway 35 this morning and a driver near to the rig when it happened said it was a “scary situation” and he was glad he was not closer.

The mishap happened at about 6.30am just south of Hikuwai Road, south of Tokomaru Bay, when the truck’s trailer tipped over.

“It looks like the trailer went too far on to the shoulder of the road and flipped,” said Tolaga Bay police officer Senior Constable Richard Reeves.

The driver on the scene moments after it happened, Manu Caddie, said he was glad he was not at that spot a fraction earlier.

“It was obvious the trailer came across on to the opposite side of the road in the crash and there were logs everywhere, mainly in the ditch.

“Fortunately, there was no one going the other way or following too close behind,” Mr Caddie said.

“It was a scary situation.”

One lane of the highway was blocked by the truck and trailer unit. It remained on the road until later this morning when the logging contractor brought in a machine to move it.

Senior Constable Reeves expected both lanes of the road would be open by midday at the latest.

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Bruce - 1 month ago
Speed?

winston moreton - 1 month ago
A log truck lost part of its load on State Highway 35 on Wednesday according to a Gisborne Herald story (17 Jan) with front-page photo evidence - an almost monthly occurrence for these vehicles in New Zealand. At least this was a standard truck and trailer, as the bigger HPMVs are not allowed to operate north of Tolaga Bay.
In NZ commercial passenger planes can only use designated flight corridors when landing or departing towns and cities, including Gisborne, for safety reasons. They have two highly-trained and experienced pilots on board. An aeroplane strike in the heart of Gisborne is nigh on impossible. An inner-city home strike by a 50 tonne truck is definitely possible and potentially more lethal.
I understand up to 300 loaded trucks are projected to visit our port on a daily basis? How can our Mayor let this happen when he has known for years that the flood of logs was on its way?

Felicity Lawrence - 1 month ago
Thirty years ago when the first lot of trees were planted, no one was sure then about the impact forestry and logging would have on Gisborne.

Cyclone Bola had just devastated our rail line, our freezing works was just shutting its doors, the local clothing factories were shutting theirs, Watties had already closed theirs, so our local people turned to forestry, farming and produce.

Yes, our logging trucks have accidents, but so do stock, produce and merchandising trucks, but you don`t whinge about them. The majority of our logging truck drivers are highly skilled and drive in places where only 4X4s or rally car racers would dare to venture.

There are currently about 150 logging trucks in Gisborne. These drivers will clock up (at least) 600km a day going back and forth on these goat tracks they call roads to provide food for their families and pay bills. You make it sound as if they crash on purpose. These men and a few women have families that they would like to come home to as well.

Please do a bit more research on truck accidents around New Zealand. You will probably find logging trucks are on the lower end of the crash scale.

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