Strong readers meet stingrays

Children receive fun reward for reaching reading goals.

Children receive fun reward for reaching reading goals.

Feeding the stingrays: The children who took part in the iRead Summer Reading Programme watch as stingrays are fed barracouta by the guides at Dive Tatapouri. Picture by Paul Rickard

A GROUP of children from the iRead Summer Reading programme at the HB Williams Memorial Library got up close and personal with stingrays yesterday as a reward for achieving their reading goals.

About 30 kids along with librarians and helpers got kitted out in waders and gumboots, taught what to expect out on the reef, then taken on a tour at low tide with the experienced guides at Dive Tatapouri.

There they were able to observe and interact with the natural inhabitants of Tatapouri Bay, including the short-tail stingray, eagle ray and yellowtail kingfish.

The group also learned about local legends and got an insight into the methods once used by Maori to manage their natural resources.

The participants in the iRead Summer Reading programme read and reviewed books from the library and recorded their reading in a journal, said Rangi Tangohau, principal librarian for children’s services.

“They brought their journals to the library where the children’s librarians checked, recorded and chatted with them about the books they had read, promoting and recommending other items of interest to them.”

When they had read and reviewed three books they chose a book to keep, and received an invitation to attend a finale party, she said.

There was an opportunity to earn four books over the programme and the finale party included a visit to Tatapouri Dive followed by refreshments.

The programme was offered to nine to 13 year olds and funded by the Eastern and Central Community Trust. It ran for six weeks during the school holidays.

A GROUP of children from the iRead Summer Reading programme at the HB Williams Memorial Library got up close and personal with stingrays yesterday as a reward for achieving their reading goals.

About 30 kids along with librarians and helpers got kitted out in waders and gumboots, taught what to expect out on the reef, then taken on a tour at low tide with the experienced guides at Dive Tatapouri.

There they were able to observe and interact with the natural inhabitants of Tatapouri Bay, including the short-tail stingray, eagle ray and yellowtail kingfish.

The group also learned about local legends and got an insight into the methods once used by Maori to manage their natural resources.

The participants in the iRead Summer Reading programme read and reviewed books from the library and recorded their reading in a journal, said Rangi Tangohau, principal librarian for children’s services.

“They brought their journals to the library where the children’s librarians checked, recorded and chatted with them about the books they had read, promoting and recommending other items of interest to them.”

When they had read and reviewed three books they chose a book to keep, and received an invitation to attend a finale party, she said.

There was an opportunity to earn four books over the programme and the finale party included a visit to Tatapouri Dive followed by refreshments.

The programme was offered to nine to 13 year olds and funded by the Eastern and Central Community Trust. It ran for six weeks during the school holidays.

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