Recycling grows at R&V

Some of the crowd at R&V.

REUSABLE cups made from recycled plastic were an eco-initiative at this summer’s Rhythm and Vines (R&V) festival as organisers look to minimising single-use plastic.

A huge emphasis is put on recycling at the festival and reusable cup supplier Globelet played a significant part in that.

According to the company, R&V now uses 20,000 reusable Globelets.

R&V would previously have used 100,000 disposable cups, Globelet chief executive Ryan Everton recently told TVNZ’s 1News.

The 25-year-old said that nearly 100 percent of the Globelet cups were accounted for.

“I think that 0.07 percent ended up in a bin,” he said.

The festival’s operations manager, Dan Turner, told 1News that in 2014 the festival had 36 tonnes of waste. By 2016 that dropped to 14 tonnes of waste.

Most festival waste comes from campground equipment, such as tents left behind.

Mr Turner said the tents are recycled with the help of the Gisborne District Council, where they are pushed out to schools who use them, or given to local community groups.

Dedicated on-site teams collect cans on the festival site.

Globelet’s reuseable cups are used at more than 3000 international events. R&V was one of the first to adopt the idea a couple of years ago.


REUSABLE cups made from recycled plastic were an eco-initiative at this summer’s Rhythm and Vines (R&V) festival as organisers look to minimising single-use plastic.

A huge emphasis is put on recycling at the festival and reusable cup supplier Globelet played a significant part in that.

According to the company, R&V now uses 20,000 reusable Globelets.

R&V would previously have used 100,000 disposable cups, Globelet chief executive Ryan Everton recently told TVNZ’s 1News.

The 25-year-old said that nearly 100 percent of the Globelet cups were accounted for.

“I think that 0.07 percent ended up in a bin,” he said.

The festival’s operations manager, Dan Turner, told 1News that in 2014 the festival had 36 tonnes of waste. By 2016 that dropped to 14 tonnes of waste.

Most festival waste comes from campground equipment, such as tents left behind.

Mr Turner said the tents are recycled with the help of the Gisborne District Council, where they are pushed out to schools who use them, or given to local community groups.

Dedicated on-site teams collect cans on the festival site.

Globelet’s reuseable cups are used at more than 3000 international events. R&V was one of the first to adopt the idea a couple of years ago.


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