Broken brings a powerful message

Feature film was filmed in Gisborne, Anaura Bay.

Feature film was filmed in Gisborne, Anaura Bay.

THE FORGIVEN: A cavalcade of motorcyclists in black jackets patched with the insignia “Jesus the Redeemer” rumble between the parted crowd in the build-up to the much-anticipated first public screening of Broken. Picture by Liam Clayton
GIZZYWOOD: In true Hollywood style the red carpet was rolled out last night for the world premiere of Broken at the Odeon. Regular people watched from the other side of the cordon, a cavalcade rolled through the crowd and the movie’s cast and crew posed for photographs. Script writer-director Tarry Mortlock is third from left. Picture by Mark Peters
MAD AS: Gisborne and East Coast men Raanz Watene (left), Phil Tarawa and Irirangi Maxwell were among locals cast as members of the Mad Bulls gang for the movie Broken, in which rival factions prepare to go to war with each other.
Picture by Liam Clayton
Broken premiere.
At the premiere.
Outside the Odeon. At the world premiere of Broken.
Outside the Odeon. At the world premiere of Broken.
Outside the Odeon. At the world premiere of Broken.
Outside the Odeon at the world premiere of Broken. Picture by Liam Clayton
Broken premiere -
Tarry Mortlock and wife Lisa Mortlock. At the world premiere of Broken.
EXCITEMENT: at the world premiere of Broken.
Script writer-director of Broken, Tarry Mortlock.

EXCITEMENT and anticipation was abundant among the crowd outside the Odeon Theatre last night for the world premiere of Broken, a feature film shot in Gisborne and Anaura Bay.

The movie’s actors, such as Ruatoria-based policeman Josh Calles, who plays Logan — a man who has left his gang life behind him but is torn between revenge and reconciliation when his daughter is murdered — and others posed outside for photographs for the media.

A cavalcade of black-jacketed motorcycle riders thundered slowly through the crowd, a kapa haka group filled the air with a passionate performance and rounded it off with a joyous waiata.

Mayor Meng Foon welcomed the 500-strong audience to the screening and VIP ticket holders made their way up the red carpet to the main cinema.

“Security is looking for you,” one man said to actor-drama teacher Jol Sparks, who plays Mad Bulls gang member Murphy in the movie.

“This man is impersonating an actor,” he joked.

The atmosphere inside the auditorium was just as familiar.

Everyone seemed to know everyone else (even the credits earned a round of applause when they rolled up at the end).

Patched-up motorcycle members sat near the front in amiable accord with The Herald’s reporter and photographer.

The motorcycle riders were not a gang like the rival factions that drive the story in Broken, but church-goers whose patches read “Jesus the Redeemer.”

Broken was written and directed by City Impact Church pastor Tarry Mortlock, who told The Herald last week the film is not a “Christian movie for Christians” but aimed at wider appeal.

Faith features in the film but the prevailing theme is forgiveness. This does not come about without considerable action between the rival gangs.

An extended version of the music video played as patrons took their seats and the director’s father, pastor Peter Mortlock hip-hopped in front of the screen to speak to the audience.

“Broken is a powerful message about forgiveness, hope and peace,” he said.

Emotion showed on his face.“Obviously, I’m quite proud of my son.”

Director Tarry Mortlock thanked the cast of largely-untrained actors from Gisborne and the East Coast for “putting yourselves out there”.

He also thanked his wife. “It takes a woman to believe in a man for a man to get things done.”

Producer Sammi Teagle thanked the people of Gisborne and East Coast.

“You have the ability to turn strangers into whanau,” she said.

“You changed us.”

  • Broken opens to the public on February 1.
  • <

EXCITEMENT and anticipation was abundant among the crowd outside the Odeon Theatre last night for the world premiere of Broken, a feature film shot in Gisborne and Anaura Bay.

The movie’s actors, such as Ruatoria-based policeman Josh Calles, who plays Logan — a man who has left his gang life behind him but is torn between revenge and reconciliation when his daughter is murdered — and others posed outside for photographs for the media.

A cavalcade of black-jacketed motorcycle riders thundered slowly through the crowd, a kapa haka group filled the air with a passionate performance and rounded it off with a joyous waiata.

Mayor Meng Foon welcomed the 500-strong audience to the screening and VIP ticket holders made their way up the red carpet to the main cinema.

“Security is looking for you,” one man said to actor-drama teacher Jol Sparks, who plays Mad Bulls gang member Murphy in the movie.

“This man is impersonating an actor,” he joked.

The atmosphere inside the auditorium was just as familiar.

Everyone seemed to know everyone else (even the credits earned a round of applause when they rolled up at the end).

Patched-up motorcycle members sat near the front in amiable accord with The Herald’s reporter and photographer.

The motorcycle riders were not a gang like the rival factions that drive the story in Broken, but church-goers whose patches read “Jesus the Redeemer.”

Broken was written and directed by City Impact Church pastor Tarry Mortlock, who told The Herald last week the film is not a “Christian movie for Christians” but aimed at wider appeal.

Faith features in the film but the prevailing theme is forgiveness. This does not come about without considerable action between the rival gangs.

An extended version of the music video played as patrons took their seats and the director’s father, pastor Peter Mortlock hip-hopped in front of the screen to speak to the audience.

“Broken is a powerful message about forgiveness, hope and peace,” he said.

Emotion showed on his face.“Obviously, I’m quite proud of my son.”

Director Tarry Mortlock thanked the cast of largely-untrained actors from Gisborne and the East Coast for “putting yourselves out there”.

He also thanked his wife. “It takes a woman to believe in a man for a man to get things done.”

Producer Sammi Teagle thanked the people of Gisborne and East Coast.

“You have the ability to turn strangers into whanau,” she said.

“You changed us.”

  • Broken opens to the public on February 1.
  • <
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Fran n clan (Gordon) - 10 months ago
Wow, this sounds great. Would have loved to have been there. Our dad was manager of Anaura Bay many years back. Beautiful place. Our mum once rode a horse straight up the hill face by school. Phew.
You have all done Iwi Maori and the wider community proud. God bless.

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