Plant-based nutrition conference first for Gisborne and Aotearoa

HAPPY AND HEALTHY: Kath Parkinson and Tama Koia at the Veg and Vines conference. They spoke of their experiences as patients taking part in the BROAD Study where participants eat a whole-food plant-based diet. Dr Nick Wright, of the BROAD study, said a plant-based diet was good for health and reduced environmental impact by using less land and water. Picture supplied

NEW Zealand’s first ever plant-based nutrition conference, Veg and Vines 2018, was held in Gisborne last month with more than 50 people attending from New Zealand and Australia.

The conference was organised by exercise physiologist Morgen Smith and GP Dr Nick Wright on behalf of the Plant Based New Zealand Health Charitable Trust (PBNZHT).

The aim was to raise awareness of the importance and benefits of a lifestyle treatments in medicine, including using a whole food, plant-based diet (WFPB diet) or simply switching to a plant-based diet.

Ms Smith, also the event MC, opened the conference by providing an overview on the evidence for WFPBD.

Nick Tupara spoke on the whakapapa of food and presented a perspective between traditional Maori diets and what we consider to be healthy today.

Shukul Kachwalla presented an evidence-based second opinion of treatment of inflammatory bowel disease through use of diet, including a personal story about his brother’s recovery from this illness.

Dr Martyn Williamson, from Central Otago, shared his experiences with shaping lifestyle change.

Jasper Robards, an organic farmer from Wairarapa, spoke about permaculture including practical messages with implications for small to medium sized sustainable farming in New Zealand.

Dr Nick Wright spoke on the Gisborne-based BROAD research programme, which evidenced lifestyle changes and discussed “how-to’’ experiences with promoting lifestyle change in general practice.

US-based Dr T Colin Campbell, a world leader in nutritional research and author of The China Study (over 3 million copies sold) joined the conference via Skype video conferencing.

He discussed some of the science behind WFPBD, relationships between diet and disease and the bureaucratic backlash/resistance received as a result of presenting this evidence-based research.

Hauora Tairawhiti emergency doctor, Dr Patrick McHugh, spoke on the effect of mindfulness and heartfulness, which are evidence based lifestyle practices and shows the importance of looking after emotional and mental health as well as physical health.

Hauora Tairawhiti public heath physician Dr Bruce Duncan spoke about the role of the health system and how lifestyle focused treatments and prevention provide more value for money than most other approaches.

Professor Ross Lawrenson discussed improving public health and the role of prevention.

Local participants Kath Parkinson, Nick Barbara, Glenis Philip-Barbara, Maree Scammell and Tama Koia shared their patient experiences going through either the BROAD study or another Gisborne-based programme.

Anna Charrington and Sue Matthews, from EIT, provided quick and easy WFPB cooking demonstrations and explained their role in the BROAD study.

Dr Peter Johnston presented preliminary results of his three-week workplace WFPBD intervention programme with health improvements shown when people change to a strict WFPBD.

Attendees said they felt more educated about a plant-based diet approach and encouraged by patient stories.

There was plenty of interest expressed in attending WFPBD being planned for next summer in Gisborne.

For further information see www.vegandvines.com or Facebook.













NEW Zealand’s first ever plant-based nutrition conference, Veg and Vines 2018, was held in Gisborne last month with more than 50 people attending from New Zealand and Australia.

The conference was organised by exercise physiologist Morgen Smith and GP Dr Nick Wright on behalf of the Plant Based New Zealand Health Charitable Trust (PBNZHT).

The aim was to raise awareness of the importance and benefits of a lifestyle treatments in medicine, including using a whole food, plant-based diet (WFPB diet) or simply switching to a plant-based diet.

Ms Smith, also the event MC, opened the conference by providing an overview on the evidence for WFPBD.

Nick Tupara spoke on the whakapapa of food and presented a perspective between traditional Maori diets and what we consider to be healthy today.

Shukul Kachwalla presented an evidence-based second opinion of treatment of inflammatory bowel disease through use of diet, including a personal story about his brother’s recovery from this illness.

Dr Martyn Williamson, from Central Otago, shared his experiences with shaping lifestyle change.

Jasper Robards, an organic farmer from Wairarapa, spoke about permaculture including practical messages with implications for small to medium sized sustainable farming in New Zealand.

Dr Nick Wright spoke on the Gisborne-based BROAD research programme, which evidenced lifestyle changes and discussed “how-to’’ experiences with promoting lifestyle change in general practice.

US-based Dr T Colin Campbell, a world leader in nutritional research and author of The China Study (over 3 million copies sold) joined the conference via Skype video conferencing.

He discussed some of the science behind WFPBD, relationships between diet and disease and the bureaucratic backlash/resistance received as a result of presenting this evidence-based research.

Hauora Tairawhiti emergency doctor, Dr Patrick McHugh, spoke on the effect of mindfulness and heartfulness, which are evidence based lifestyle practices and shows the importance of looking after emotional and mental health as well as physical health.

Hauora Tairawhiti public heath physician Dr Bruce Duncan spoke about the role of the health system and how lifestyle focused treatments and prevention provide more value for money than most other approaches.

Professor Ross Lawrenson discussed improving public health and the role of prevention.

Local participants Kath Parkinson, Nick Barbara, Glenis Philip-Barbara, Maree Scammell and Tama Koia shared their patient experiences going through either the BROAD study or another Gisborne-based programme.

Anna Charrington and Sue Matthews, from EIT, provided quick and easy WFPB cooking demonstrations and explained their role in the BROAD study.

Dr Peter Johnston presented preliminary results of his three-week workplace WFPBD intervention programme with health improvements shown when people change to a strict WFPBD.

Attendees said they felt more educated about a plant-based diet approach and encouraged by patient stories.

There was plenty of interest expressed in attending WFPBD being planned for next summer in Gisborne.

For further information see www.vegandvines.com or Facebook.













Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you agree with the Mayor that there is a case for returning to zebra crossings in the city centre?