Dogs in pound with 'P' symptoms

DOGS allegedly addicted to methamphetamine (P) are turning up at the Gisborne dog pound.

The dogs display erratic behaviour and common withdrawal symptoms such as the shakes.

Gisborne District Council (GDC) animal control team leader Ross Hannam said while he could not confirm the dogs were suffering from exposure to P without doing blood tests, it was certainly the impression the dogs were giving to staff.

“Dogs have the shakes and their behaviour, we describe it like bipolar; you don’t know what mood they’re going to be in one minute to the next.”

Mr Hannam said one minute they would be fine, then you would come back a minute later and they would want to bite or attack you.

“We are probably getting one a month like that. Sometimes we don’t get any, then we get two or three like that a month.

“You just have to be cautious, be aware of it and let staff know.

“Pretty much all of the owners of those dogs never come forward.

“They’re not registered or anything like that and, of course, we can’t re-home them.”

Around 12 a year

Mr Hannam said the pound would get about 10 to 12 dogs a year that had been exposed to their owner’s drug habits.

Dogs are required to be held for seven days at the pound to give owners a chance to retrieve them and pay any outstanding fines. Those not collected are euthanised.

Mr Hannam said 130 dogs were rehomed last year, and the thanks for that went to Mutts and Moggies.

Mutts and Moggies chairwoman Donna Cullingford said it would not surprise her that dogs were turning up at the pound addicted to P.

“People used to feed marijuana to their dogs, so P is the next thing,” she said.

Mrs Cullingford said she worked closely with staff of the Gisborne dog pound, who would let her know if a dog with a nice nature had not been collected.

From there, friends of Mrs Cullingford stepped in. One took the dog to be treated for fleas, worms and desexed, while the other kept the dog at home until a suitable owner could be found.

Dogs or puppies are advertised on Trade Me and all potential owners are vetted thoroughly.

The dogs are popular and in January alone, homes were found for nine dogs. One puppy recently had more than 2000 online views.

Last year the charity rehomed 130 dogs but the main bulk of their work was desexing animals for low-income families.

Since they started almost three years ago, they had desexed 1000 cats.

DOGS allegedly addicted to methamphetamine (P) are turning up at the Gisborne dog pound.

The dogs display erratic behaviour and common withdrawal symptoms such as the shakes.

Gisborne District Council (GDC) animal control team leader Ross Hannam said while he could not confirm the dogs were suffering from exposure to P without doing blood tests, it was certainly the impression the dogs were giving to staff.

“Dogs have the shakes and their behaviour, we describe it like bipolar; you don’t know what mood they’re going to be in one minute to the next.”

Mr Hannam said one minute they would be fine, then you would come back a minute later and they would want to bite or attack you.

“We are probably getting one a month like that. Sometimes we don’t get any, then we get two or three like that a month.

“You just have to be cautious, be aware of it and let staff know.

“Pretty much all of the owners of those dogs never come forward.

“They’re not registered or anything like that and, of course, we can’t re-home them.”

Around 12 a year

Mr Hannam said the pound would get about 10 to 12 dogs a year that had been exposed to their owner’s drug habits.

Dogs are required to be held for seven days at the pound to give owners a chance to retrieve them and pay any outstanding fines. Those not collected are euthanised.

Mr Hannam said 130 dogs were rehomed last year, and the thanks for that went to Mutts and Moggies.

Mutts and Moggies chairwoman Donna Cullingford said it would not surprise her that dogs were turning up at the pound addicted to P.

“People used to feed marijuana to their dogs, so P is the next thing,” she said.

Mrs Cullingford said she worked closely with staff of the Gisborne dog pound, who would let her know if a dog with a nice nature had not been collected.

From there, friends of Mrs Cullingford stepped in. One took the dog to be treated for fleas, worms and desexed, while the other kept the dog at home until a suitable owner could be found.

Dogs or puppies are advertised on Trade Me and all potential owners are vetted thoroughly.

The dogs are popular and in January alone, homes were found for nine dogs. One puppy recently had more than 2000 online views.

Last year the charity rehomed 130 dogs but the main bulk of their work was desexing animals for low-income families.

Since they started almost three years ago, they had desexed 1000 cats.

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