Severe weather warning issued for Gisborne

Ex-tropical Cyclone Hola imminent.

Ex-tropical Cyclone Hola imminent.

Hola is now an ex-Cylone, but it still has Category 1 strength. Phil Duncan Twitter image

The approaching weather system poses a potential threat to the New Zealand Surf Lifesaving Championships, that start here on Thursday.

If the rain gets too heavy for the city sewage system, the council might be forced to carry out emergency sewage discharges and that would mean a health warning on the city beaches for five days.

Heavy rain forecast

A severe weather warning has been issued for Gisborne, with rainfall of 100 to 150 millimetres forecast from 11am today through to 3am Tuesday.

“We will watch the situation really closely,” said Gisborne District Council lifelines manager David Wilson.

“The wastewater team are out doing checks to make sure that the system is operating as best it can.

“We are in contact with the championships organisers and will let them know if anything eventuates that we have to open the scours,” Mr Wilson said.

“But we will be working hard to not open them if possible.”

Event referee Debbie Hutchings, from Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti, says they are very concerned and moving the event to another location is a possibility.

The event management committee would meet tonight to work out if it is doable, she said.

There is a lot of infrastructure in place, so shifting the venue would not be straightforward.

“The conditions are looking good but it’s just the water quality that could prove a problem if the District Council is forced to release the valves.”

“If the rain is dumped in the ranges or north of Tolaga Bay we may be OK, but if it comes south it could be disastrous she said.

“It’s a watch and see.”

Thousands from around NZ expected in Gisborne later this week

Close to 3000 surf lifesaving athletes, officials and supporters from around the country are expected to arrive in Gisborne for the event later this week.

Rain is expected to develop around midday today, with heavy falls and thunderstorms. It is forecast to ease overnight.

MetService said Gisborne can expect between 100 and 150 millimetres of rain to accumulate north of the city, especially about the ranges, and 70 to 100 millimetres further south during this time.

Peak intensities of 25 to 40 millimetres of rain per hour in the north are predicted.

There is also a strong wind warning with wind gusts that could potentially damage trees, power lines and unsecured structures.

Driving could be hazardous, especially for high-sided vehicles and motorcycles.

Gale southeasterlies will develop this evening, then turning gale south to southwesterly overnight Monday, with severe gales gusting to 120 kilometres an hour in exposed places, especially north of Tolaga Bay.

The latest information on the severe weather and impacts can be found here.

  • Go to the NZ Transport Agency website for the state of the highways and phone the Gisborne District Council on 0800 653 800 to report problems

The approaching weather system poses a potential threat to the New Zealand Surf Lifesaving Championships, that start here on Thursday.

If the rain gets too heavy for the city sewage system, the council might be forced to carry out emergency sewage discharges and that would mean a health warning on the city beaches for five days.

Heavy rain forecast

A severe weather warning has been issued for Gisborne, with rainfall of 100 to 150 millimetres forecast from 11am today through to 3am Tuesday.

“We will watch the situation really closely,” said Gisborne District Council lifelines manager David Wilson.

“The wastewater team are out doing checks to make sure that the system is operating as best it can.

“We are in contact with the championships organisers and will let them know if anything eventuates that we have to open the scours,” Mr Wilson said.

“But we will be working hard to not open them if possible.”

Event referee Debbie Hutchings, from Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti, says they are very concerned and moving the event to another location is a possibility.

The event management committee would meet tonight to work out if it is doable, she said.

There is a lot of infrastructure in place, so shifting the venue would not be straightforward.

“The conditions are looking good but it’s just the water quality that could prove a problem if the District Council is forced to release the valves.”

“If the rain is dumped in the ranges or north of Tolaga Bay we may be OK, but if it comes south it could be disastrous she said.

“It’s a watch and see.”

Thousands from around NZ expected in Gisborne later this week

Close to 3000 surf lifesaving athletes, officials and supporters from around the country are expected to arrive in Gisborne for the event later this week.

Rain is expected to develop around midday today, with heavy falls and thunderstorms. It is forecast to ease overnight.

MetService said Gisborne can expect between 100 and 150 millimetres of rain to accumulate north of the city, especially about the ranges, and 70 to 100 millimetres further south during this time.

Peak intensities of 25 to 40 millimetres of rain per hour in the north are predicted.

There is also a strong wind warning with wind gusts that could potentially damage trees, power lines and unsecured structures.

Driving could be hazardous, especially for high-sided vehicles and motorcycles.

Gale southeasterlies will develop this evening, then turning gale south to southwesterly overnight Monday, with severe gales gusting to 120 kilometres an hour in exposed places, especially north of Tolaga Bay.

The latest information on the severe weather and impacts can be found here.

  • Go to the NZ Transport Agency website for the state of the highways and phone the Gisborne District Council on 0800 653 800 to report problems

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