Waimata learns 2km of new seal coming this year

Mayor Meng Foon delivers the good news.

Mayor Meng Foon delivers the good news.

A good turnout of a dozen people at the first Gisborne District Council annual plan community consultation meeting, at Waimata, were delighted to hear their road is to be finally sealed.

Mayor Meng Foon gave the good news that two kilometres of unsealed road would be tarsealed in the summer of the first year of the plan.

“That is the plan. So, as long as nothing changes between now and June 28, when the new plan is adopted, your road will be sealed.”

Unsealed 2km the topic of discussion for a long time

The unsealed two kilometres of the road leading to the former school and the community hall has been a topic of discussion at the meeting every year for a long time.

Mr Foon encouraged people to make submissions about the road to make sure it stayed where it was in the plan.

After a short explanation by Mr Foon about what the council had in its plans, resident Michael Patterson said the council had the means and the contractors to get things done.

“Get the money you need and do the jobs.

“Why should we have sewage going out into our beautiful bay?”

Councillor Pat Seymour said people should make submissions on the representation review to make sure they got the rural representation they wanted.

Every six years every council is required to review its representation.

The Gisborne council proposal to have 14 councillors and five wards needed a final vote to go through, he said.

“We need your submissions because there is a school of thought to have one city ward with nine councillors and one rural ward with three or four councillors.”

This would mean rural people would not be voting for the person they wanted, she said.

Mr Foon told the meeting the Government was “very “ interested in this district and he was excited about what might come out of the regional Tuawhenua plan.

Submissions from each region closed on Friday and there was a “substantial package” to be considered by central government from here.

Among it, Mr Foon said he hoped for financial help with roading.

“Personally, I have never seen such interest — and never had more meetings with members of Parliament.”

Chief executive Nedine Thatcher Swann said the council was not depending on central government.

The last annual plan contained $129 million for roading capital and this had been increased by $60 million to $190 million for the next 10 years.

A good turnout of a dozen people at the first Gisborne District Council annual plan community consultation meeting, at Waimata, were delighted to hear their road is to be finally sealed.

Mayor Meng Foon gave the good news that two kilometres of unsealed road would be tarsealed in the summer of the first year of the plan.

“That is the plan. So, as long as nothing changes between now and June 28, when the new plan is adopted, your road will be sealed.”

Unsealed 2km the topic of discussion for a long time

The unsealed two kilometres of the road leading to the former school and the community hall has been a topic of discussion at the meeting every year for a long time.

Mr Foon encouraged people to make submissions about the road to make sure it stayed where it was in the plan.

After a short explanation by Mr Foon about what the council had in its plans, resident Michael Patterson said the council had the means and the contractors to get things done.

“Get the money you need and do the jobs.

“Why should we have sewage going out into our beautiful bay?”

Councillor Pat Seymour said people should make submissions on the representation review to make sure they got the rural representation they wanted.

Every six years every council is required to review its representation.

The Gisborne council proposal to have 14 councillors and five wards needed a final vote to go through, he said.

“We need your submissions because there is a school of thought to have one city ward with nine councillors and one rural ward with three or four councillors.”

This would mean rural people would not be voting for the person they wanted, she said.

Mr Foon told the meeting the Government was “very “ interested in this district and he was excited about what might come out of the regional Tuawhenua plan.

Submissions from each region closed on Friday and there was a “substantial package” to be considered by central government from here.

Among it, Mr Foon said he hoped for financial help with roading.

“Personally, I have never seen such interest — and never had more meetings with members of Parliament.”

Chief executive Nedine Thatcher Swann said the council was not depending on central government.

The last annual plan contained $129 million for roading capital and this had been increased by $60 million to $190 million for the next 10 years.

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