Moratorium on further offshore oil exploration licences welcomed

THE Government’s announcement that it will place a moratorium on further offshore oil exploration licences has been welcomed here and a leading opponent of oil and gas exploration over the years, Manu Caddie, says it is “a small step in the right direction”.

The Government announced today it would allow any future licences only in the Taranaki area, not anywhere else around the New Zealand coastline.

Environmental campaigners in this region have vowed for several years to continue to stand up against oil and gas exploration in the region, particularly offshore.

They have pointed to the risks posed to marine life and kaimoana.

Protests spiked two years ago when several oil exploration companies shifted their interest to this region, noteably Norwegian oil company Statoil.

“While the Government’s announcement to end new offshore petroleum exploration permits is a largely symbolic gesture in terms of its impact on greenhouse gas emissions, it is a small step in the right direction,” Mr Caddie said this morning.

“While existing permits have decades still to run and New Zealand sources fuel oil offshore, it is a sensible move given the climate disaster our children will inherit.

“The disaster currently unfolding over 13,000 hectares of Balikpapan Bay in Indonesia and the disasters caused by oil exploration in other parts of the planet over recent years are further reasons why it’s a good move.”

Mr Caddie said more than ever this Government needed to incentivise a rapid shift away from reliance on fossil fuels, particularly in electricity generation, manufacturing and transport.

“Emitters and carbon markets need urgent action from the Government on ETS regulations — removing the cap on the price of carbon is a simple change that needs to happen immediately.”

Mr Caddie said the Hikirangi Group was totally focused on a different kind of oil exploration on the East Coast.

“We have spent hundreds of thousands on kanuka oil and cannabis oil exploration over the last two years, and harakeke oil is the next cab off the rank for us.

“Our oil exploration is likely to have multiple environmental, cultural and economic benefits.

“These products and the science behind them are creating sustainable, high value jobs that the region, and the country, needs and we appreciate support from the region and central government to quickly commercialise sustainable oil production and products made here.”

THE Government’s announcement that it will place a moratorium on further offshore oil exploration licences has been welcomed here and a leading opponent of oil and gas exploration over the years, Manu Caddie, says it is “a small step in the right direction”.

The Government announced today it would allow any future licences only in the Taranaki area, not anywhere else around the New Zealand coastline.

Environmental campaigners in this region have vowed for several years to continue to stand up against oil and gas exploration in the region, particularly offshore.

They have pointed to the risks posed to marine life and kaimoana.

Protests spiked two years ago when several oil exploration companies shifted their interest to this region, noteably Norwegian oil company Statoil.

“While the Government’s announcement to end new offshore petroleum exploration permits is a largely symbolic gesture in terms of its impact on greenhouse gas emissions, it is a small step in the right direction,” Mr Caddie said this morning.

“While existing permits have decades still to run and New Zealand sources fuel oil offshore, it is a sensible move given the climate disaster our children will inherit.

“The disaster currently unfolding over 13,000 hectares of Balikpapan Bay in Indonesia and the disasters caused by oil exploration in other parts of the planet over recent years are further reasons why it’s a good move.”

Mr Caddie said more than ever this Government needed to incentivise a rapid shift away from reliance on fossil fuels, particularly in electricity generation, manufacturing and transport.

“Emitters and carbon markets need urgent action from the Government on ETS regulations — removing the cap on the price of carbon is a simple change that needs to happen immediately.”

Mr Caddie said the Hikirangi Group was totally focused on a different kind of oil exploration on the East Coast.

“We have spent hundreds of thousands on kanuka oil and cannabis oil exploration over the last two years, and harakeke oil is the next cab off the rank for us.

“Our oil exploration is likely to have multiple environmental, cultural and economic benefits.

“These products and the science behind them are creating sustainable, high value jobs that the region, and the country, needs and we appreciate support from the region and central government to quickly commercialise sustainable oil production and products made here.”

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