Life membership for Show service

Two veterans recognised.

Two veterans recognised.

Dog trial veteran Rod Mead (centre) and veteran topdresser Andy Stevenson (at right) have been recognised for their service to the A & P Spring Show, and in Mr Stevenson’s case service also to agriculture in general in the district. They have been made life members of the show association and received their awards from association president Norm Thomas (at left) on Wednesday night. Picture by Ross Buscke

Poverty Bay A & P Association has bestowed life membership on two stalwarts of the annual Spring Show, one for his many years running the dog trials and the other for his contribution to the Show and to agriculture in general.

Rod Mead and Andy Stevenson received their life membership awards at the association’s annual general meeting on Wednesday night at Showgrounds Park.

“Rod typifies the qualities this association is founded on,” said association president Norm Thomas.

“He is committed to his volunteer role and seeks to pass on his knowledge and experience to the next generations in his chosen sport and pastime of dog trialling.”

Mr Mead has been head steward in the dog trials at the Show since 2002 and has been a part of the team running the trials for more than 50 years.

“To be made a life member of the association was something I never expected, and it’s an honour,” he said.

“I could not run the dog trials at the Show on my own. I’ve always been part of a team, and we’ve had a great team over the years.

“Everyone does their job and it runs well.

“The sheep have played their part too. We’ve had some good stock to run the competition with over the years.”

Mr Mead said he took the job on in 2002 in the hope he could find someone to keep it going, and finally he has.

“This year’s Show will be my last as head steward and Andrew Savage, who was the judge last year, has put his hand up to take over after me.”

He has been thrilled to see the size of the competition grow.

“When I took over, the average turnout was 140 entries. Now it’s up to 250.”

Andy Stevenson, from Farmers Air, was described by Mr Thomas as a “true gentleman” who had made an enormous contribution to the agricultural industry as a result of his passion, aviation.

“In aerial topdressing he is considered a pioneer, an innovator, a mentor, a trainer and an icon. To our organisation, he has been a generous supporter for many years and more recently, from 2012, under the banner of Farmers Air Ltd, has been a substantial naming rights sponsor of the events centre,” Mr Thomas said.

“With his life membership we recognise those contributions and his lifetime achievements.”

Mr Stevenson said it was an honour to receive the life membership.

“It came out of the blue. It’s a sign of appreciation from the many farmers I have worked for over the years.

“It’s a huge honour they have bestowed on me. I am really touched and I thank the association very much.”

Mr Thomas said he was extremely honoured to be able to make the presentations to the new life members.

“Etching their names into the history of the association would have to be one of the highlights of my first year as president.”

Poverty Bay A & P Association has bestowed life membership on two stalwarts of the annual Spring Show, one for his many years running the dog trials and the other for his contribution to the Show and to agriculture in general.

Rod Mead and Andy Stevenson received their life membership awards at the association’s annual general meeting on Wednesday night at Showgrounds Park.

“Rod typifies the qualities this association is founded on,” said association president Norm Thomas.

“He is committed to his volunteer role and seeks to pass on his knowledge and experience to the next generations in his chosen sport and pastime of dog trialling.”

Mr Mead has been head steward in the dog trials at the Show since 2002 and has been a part of the team running the trials for more than 50 years.

“To be made a life member of the association was something I never expected, and it’s an honour,” he said.

“I could not run the dog trials at the Show on my own. I’ve always been part of a team, and we’ve had a great team over the years.

“Everyone does their job and it runs well.

“The sheep have played their part too. We’ve had some good stock to run the competition with over the years.”

Mr Mead said he took the job on in 2002 in the hope he could find someone to keep it going, and finally he has.

“This year’s Show will be my last as head steward and Andrew Savage, who was the judge last year, has put his hand up to take over after me.”

He has been thrilled to see the size of the competition grow.

“When I took over, the average turnout was 140 entries. Now it’s up to 250.”

Andy Stevenson, from Farmers Air, was described by Mr Thomas as a “true gentleman” who had made an enormous contribution to the agricultural industry as a result of his passion, aviation.

“In aerial topdressing he is considered a pioneer, an innovator, a mentor, a trainer and an icon. To our organisation, he has been a generous supporter for many years and more recently, from 2012, under the banner of Farmers Air Ltd, has been a substantial naming rights sponsor of the events centre,” Mr Thomas said.

“With his life membership we recognise those contributions and his lifetime achievements.”

Mr Stevenson said it was an honour to receive the life membership.

“It came out of the blue. It’s a sign of appreciation from the many farmers I have worked for over the years.

“It’s a huge honour they have bestowed on me. I am really touched and I thank the association very much.”

Mr Thomas said he was extremely honoured to be able to make the presentations to the new life members.

“Etching their names into the history of the association would have to be one of the highlights of my first year as president.”

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