Big crowd to welcome new Bishop of Aotearoa

Don Tamihere installed into new position at Manutuke Marae.

Don Tamihere installed into new position at Manutuke Marae.

The new Bishop of Aotearoa Don Tamihere was installed into his new position at Manutuke Marae on Saturday. Pictures by Paul Rickard
Ceremony at Manutuke Marae.

Hundreds turned out to show their support for the new Bishop of Aotearoa Don Tamihere, who was installed as head of the Maori Anglican Church at a ceremony at Manutuke Marae on Saturday.

He also became an Archbishop and Primate of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia, joining Archbishop Philip Richardson (Pakeha) and Archbishop Winson Halapua (Polynesia).

Since 1992, the church has consisted of three tikanga, or cultural streams — Maori, Pakeha and Polynesia.

Archbishop Tamihere, born in Gisborne and from Ngati Porou, now leads the Maori arm of the church and is the youngest primate in the Anglican communion.

His installation drew Anglican Church members and leaders from throughout New Zealand and the Pacific, as well as other Maori denominations.

Visitors and dignitaries from around the country attended, including the Maori King, King Tuheitia.
Archbishop Tamihere, who is also Bishop of Tairawhiti, becomes the sixth Bishop of Aotearoa, succeeding the late

Archbishop Wiremu Brown Turei, who passed away in January 2017.

The day began with a mass powhiri by Tairawhiti iwi for all visitors to the region, followed by formal proceedings in Toko

Toru Tapu Church, then a public installation back at the marae.

High school students from Te Aute College, Hukarere College and Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Horouta Wananga had a key role in the service welcoming the new archbishop.

They called on Archbishop Tamihere to take his place to lead the people.

These sentiments were also shared by the fellow leaders of the church.
“Welcome, let us greet our newly- recognised archbishop with great gladness,” said Archbishop Halapua.
“May God the Father grant you power to guide and rule Christ’s church with courage and love,” said Archbishop Richardson.

At the conclusion of the service, the people showed their support with a rousing performance of renowned East Coast haka Ka Panapana and Ruaumoko.

Archbishop Tamihere showed his acknowledgement by joining in the haka.
“Ki tonu taku ngakau — my heart is full,” said Archbishop Tamihere.


Hundreds turned out to show their support for the new Bishop of Aotearoa Don Tamihere, who was installed as head of the Maori Anglican Church at a ceremony at Manutuke Marae on Saturday.

He also became an Archbishop and Primate of the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia, joining Archbishop Philip Richardson (Pakeha) and Archbishop Winson Halapua (Polynesia).

Since 1992, the church has consisted of three tikanga, or cultural streams — Maori, Pakeha and Polynesia.

Archbishop Tamihere, born in Gisborne and from Ngati Porou, now leads the Maori arm of the church and is the youngest primate in the Anglican communion.

His installation drew Anglican Church members and leaders from throughout New Zealand and the Pacific, as well as other Maori denominations.

Visitors and dignitaries from around the country attended, including the Maori King, King Tuheitia.
Archbishop Tamihere, who is also Bishop of Tairawhiti, becomes the sixth Bishop of Aotearoa, succeeding the late

Archbishop Wiremu Brown Turei, who passed away in January 2017.

The day began with a mass powhiri by Tairawhiti iwi for all visitors to the region, followed by formal proceedings in Toko

Toru Tapu Church, then a public installation back at the marae.

High school students from Te Aute College, Hukarere College and Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Horouta Wananga had a key role in the service welcoming the new archbishop.

They called on Archbishop Tamihere to take his place to lead the people.

These sentiments were also shared by the fellow leaders of the church.
“Welcome, let us greet our newly- recognised archbishop with great gladness,” said Archbishop Halapua.
“May God the Father grant you power to guide and rule Christ’s church with courage and love,” said Archbishop Richardson.

At the conclusion of the service, the people showed their support with a rousing performance of renowned East Coast haka Ka Panapana and Ruaumoko.

Archbishop Tamihere showed his acknowledgement by joining in the haka.
“Ki tonu taku ngakau — my heart is full,” said Archbishop Tamihere.


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