‘Exciting plans are under way’

'Momentum is growing'.

'Momentum is growing'.

Together chairing the national co-ordinating committee for Tuia Encounters 250, Dame Jenny Shipley and Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr made their first visit to Gisborne earlier this year as part of ongoing event planning. Picture by Paul Rickard

The collaboration and leadership experienced here has inspired and motivated Dame Jenny Shipley and Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr, who together chair the national coordinating committee, Tuia Encounters 250.

They were in Gisborne as part of ongoing planning towards the 2019 event and were both impressed and privileged to meet with Te Ha 1769-2019 Sestercentennial organisers and the community.

Dame Jenny said she was honoured to be a part of Tuia Encounters 250 and the visit to Gisborne had been an amazing first step.

“Having multiple voices represented in the planning is essential and to participate in this with the people of Gisborne has been incredible.

“Commemorating the journeying traditions without ignoring the challenges is a highly worthwhile endeavour and provides us all with a meaningful place to stand.”

Mr Barclay-Kerr said he felt confident that local events planned would assist in providing all New Zealanders better understanding of our complex history.

“This was my first visit as a newly- appointed co-chair and I was struck by the work already undertaken by many volunteers over many years, and hearing their views of the significance of this kaupapa for their region.”

Tuia Encounters 250, a national commemoration, will mark 250 years since the first meetings between Maori and Europeans during James Cook and the Endeavour’s 1769 voyage.

The commemoration uses a Maori name (Tuia) and European concept of time and commemoration (Encounters 250).

Tuia means ‘‘to weave or bind together’’ and is drawn from a whakatauki (proverb) and karakia (ritual chant) that refers to the intangible bonds established between people when they work together.

The Ministry of Culture and Heritage is responsible for co-ordinating commemorative activities and providing support to regional commemorative programmes.

The Department of Internal Affairs has announced that $9 million of funding will be available for community projects that align with the kaupapa of Tuia Encounters 250 through the Lottery Environment and Heritage Fund.

Dame Jenny and Mr Barclay-Kerr have welcomed the fund.

“Exciting plans are under way and momentum is growing, particularly in the four locations of Gisborne, the Bay of Islands, Coromandel and Marlborough where Europeans and Maori first met 250 years ago in October 1769.

This fund will help people all over the country get involved to bring to life the Tuia experience trail of great events and the development of legacy projects.

“We want to extend the reach as far as possible and ensure every New Zealander has an opportunity to explore New Zealanders’ stories, to listen, to talk and to share through Tuia Encounters 250.”

It will include an opening ceremony in Gisborne in October 2019, from where a flotilla of historic and contemporary vessels will travel to sites of significance around New Zealand.

“Our country is only 250 years young and to commemorate the initial shared breath in the harbour will be important for Tairawhiti and New Zealand,” said Dame Jenny.

Planned events and legacy projects include ecological restoration, cultural and education initiatives and regional tourism development.

The collaboration and leadership experienced here has inspired and motivated Dame Jenny Shipley and Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr, who together chair the national coordinating committee, Tuia Encounters 250.

They were in Gisborne as part of ongoing planning towards the 2019 event and were both impressed and privileged to meet with Te Ha 1769-2019 Sestercentennial organisers and the community.

Dame Jenny said she was honoured to be a part of Tuia Encounters 250 and the visit to Gisborne had been an amazing first step.

“Having multiple voices represented in the planning is essential and to participate in this with the people of Gisborne has been incredible.

“Commemorating the journeying traditions without ignoring the challenges is a highly worthwhile endeavour and provides us all with a meaningful place to stand.”

Mr Barclay-Kerr said he felt confident that local events planned would assist in providing all New Zealanders better understanding of our complex history.

“This was my first visit as a newly- appointed co-chair and I was struck by the work already undertaken by many volunteers over many years, and hearing their views of the significance of this kaupapa for their region.”

Tuia Encounters 250, a national commemoration, will mark 250 years since the first meetings between Maori and Europeans during James Cook and the Endeavour’s 1769 voyage.

The commemoration uses a Maori name (Tuia) and European concept of time and commemoration (Encounters 250).

Tuia means ‘‘to weave or bind together’’ and is drawn from a whakatauki (proverb) and karakia (ritual chant) that refers to the intangible bonds established between people when they work together.

The Ministry of Culture and Heritage is responsible for co-ordinating commemorative activities and providing support to regional commemorative programmes.

The Department of Internal Affairs has announced that $9 million of funding will be available for community projects that align with the kaupapa of Tuia Encounters 250 through the Lottery Environment and Heritage Fund.

Dame Jenny and Mr Barclay-Kerr have welcomed the fund.

“Exciting plans are under way and momentum is growing, particularly in the four locations of Gisborne, the Bay of Islands, Coromandel and Marlborough where Europeans and Maori first met 250 years ago in October 1769.

This fund will help people all over the country get involved to bring to life the Tuia experience trail of great events and the development of legacy projects.

“We want to extend the reach as far as possible and ensure every New Zealander has an opportunity to explore New Zealanders’ stories, to listen, to talk and to share through Tuia Encounters 250.”

It will include an opening ceremony in Gisborne in October 2019, from where a flotilla of historic and contemporary vessels will travel to sites of significance around New Zealand.

“Our country is only 250 years young and to commemorate the initial shared breath in the harbour will be important for Tairawhiti and New Zealand,” said Dame Jenny.

Planned events and legacy projects include ecological restoration, cultural and education initiatives and regional tourism development.

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Jennifer Moses, Waikaremoana - 5 months ago
Wow