Licence to Work proving a win-win

Three-year-old Annalyse Podjursky enjoys some play time with Campion College student Courtney Jones, who is on work placement at Sticky Fingers childcare. Courtney’s placement is part of Activate Tairawhiti’s Licence to Work programme, which is aimed at getting young people work-ready. Picture supplied

The volunteer component of the region’s Licence to Work Programme stands out for employer David Whitfield.

Licence to Work (LTW) began here last year as part of the Tairawhiti Economic Action Plan’s Youth Employment Strategy.

The aim of the programme is get young people between the ages of 16 to 24 work-ready.

To receive their licence, students complete a minimum of 10 hours community work, 80 hours work placement and 18 hours of training modules.

Mr Whitfield, co-owner of Frank and Albie’s cafe, said the volunteer commitment students made before they got to employers was an outstanding feature of LTW.

“What someone does outside of work is something we look for in employees,” he said.

“We try to be involved in the community as much as possible so that volunteer effort is important to us.

“Then they make an 80-hour commitment to us, as opposed to a few hours on a Friday away from school.”

Mr Whitfield said staff development was part of the brief at Frank and Albie’s.

“For our staff, teaching is a good way of learning. It is also a good way to bring in potential new staff after the programme finishes.”

Sticky Fingers Childcare and Education Centre is another work place on the LTW books.

Owner Natalie Torrance said the programme provided students with valuable skills, experience and opportunities for a successful transition to the workplace.

“We are pleased to support Licence to Work as the employability principles taught in the programme align with our own work ethos and staff code of conduct.”

Campion College student Courtney Jones, 18, is on placement at Sticky Fingers.

“It is really good and really fun. Licence to Work teaches you a lot of skills, some of which I already have, but others that are giving me the opportunity to learn,” said Courtney.

Sticky Fingers Centre manager Dianne Brooking has been overseeing Courtney and says she has a lot of skills they look for.

“We would not think about her suitability if we had a job available. We know she is suitable and I think that is thanks to Licence to Work.

“At first Courtney was a bit anxious so we have been supporting her and she is doing great.

“Combine that with school input and Licence to Work and you have a student who is really well-supported all-round.

“I think that is why this programme works.”

Courtney is the first of 99 students — up from 83 participants last year — to begin placements across the region this month.

Activate Tairawhiti Employability Works Coordinator Karen Fenn says the increase in numbers shows youth are responding to the programme.

“Licence to Work is immensely beneficial to the Tairawhiti region. It means we have a pool of youth who have the confidence to be in a workplace and engage with employers.”

Mrs Fenn says the programme also helps create satisfied employers, who in-turn foster reliable and competent staff.

“It is fantastic to have employers on board who see the bigger picture and are willing to take time to invest in our youth, too.”

  • Employers interested in the Licence to Work programme can contact Karen Fenn at karen@activatetairawhiti.co.nz while students should contact their school or training provider.
  • <

The volunteer component of the region’s Licence to Work Programme stands out for employer David Whitfield.

Licence to Work (LTW) began here last year as part of the Tairawhiti Economic Action Plan’s Youth Employment Strategy.

The aim of the programme is get young people between the ages of 16 to 24 work-ready.

To receive their licence, students complete a minimum of 10 hours community work, 80 hours work placement and 18 hours of training modules.

Mr Whitfield, co-owner of Frank and Albie’s cafe, said the volunteer commitment students made before they got to employers was an outstanding feature of LTW.

“What someone does outside of work is something we look for in employees,” he said.

“We try to be involved in the community as much as possible so that volunteer effort is important to us.

“Then they make an 80-hour commitment to us, as opposed to a few hours on a Friday away from school.”

Mr Whitfield said staff development was part of the brief at Frank and Albie’s.

“For our staff, teaching is a good way of learning. It is also a good way to bring in potential new staff after the programme finishes.”

Sticky Fingers Childcare and Education Centre is another work place on the LTW books.

Owner Natalie Torrance said the programme provided students with valuable skills, experience and opportunities for a successful transition to the workplace.

“We are pleased to support Licence to Work as the employability principles taught in the programme align with our own work ethos and staff code of conduct.”

Campion College student Courtney Jones, 18, is on placement at Sticky Fingers.

“It is really good and really fun. Licence to Work teaches you a lot of skills, some of which I already have, but others that are giving me the opportunity to learn,” said Courtney.

Sticky Fingers Centre manager Dianne Brooking has been overseeing Courtney and says she has a lot of skills they look for.

“We would not think about her suitability if we had a job available. We know she is suitable and I think that is thanks to Licence to Work.

“At first Courtney was a bit anxious so we have been supporting her and she is doing great.

“Combine that with school input and Licence to Work and you have a student who is really well-supported all-round.

“I think that is why this programme works.”

Courtney is the first of 99 students — up from 83 participants last year — to begin placements across the region this month.

Activate Tairawhiti Employability Works Coordinator Karen Fenn says the increase in numbers shows youth are responding to the programme.

“Licence to Work is immensely beneficial to the Tairawhiti region. It means we have a pool of youth who have the confidence to be in a workplace and engage with employers.”

Mrs Fenn says the programme also helps create satisfied employers, who in-turn foster reliable and competent staff.

“It is fantastic to have employers on board who see the bigger picture and are willing to take time to invest in our youth, too.”

  • Employers interested in the Licence to Work programme can contact Karen Fenn at karen@activatetairawhiti.co.nz while students should contact their school or training provider.
  • <
Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    ​​If the council does proceed with an online voting option for the 2019 election, will you likely vote online or by ballot paper?