How would we survive after climate change?

Bibby's project not included in long term plan

Bibby's project not included in long term plan

How would the East Coast community of the future survive the worst effects of climate change?

This is a question Tolaga Bay resident Clive Bibby wants Gisborne District Council to investigate.

Mr Bibby provided a project on this topic to the council to be included in its Long Term Plan (LTP), where it could be visible at a national level and eligible for funding from the Government’s $1 billion Regional Development Fund.

“We should be prepared to design and execute a plan for restructuring infrastructure suitable for the needs of the community of the future.

“The number one responsibility of council is to keep the citizens of Tairawhiti safe both physically and economically against either current or predicted threats to our survival such as climate change.”

Mr Bibby wanted the investigation to focus on what a “post-climate change community” would look like, and how it would support itself economically “based on dramatically different income streams”.

“If the hill country livestock industry is reduced to a shadow of its former self, then we can plan for establishing new industries based on resources that have, up until now, been significantly under-utilised.”

Mr Bibby said for example, the Poverty Bay Flats could be developed by supplying enough water to support agriculture businesses to produce high-end crops in a non-pollutant way.

“Interestingly, this sort of development will probably be the way of the future anyway, irrespective of whether the negative effects of climate change materialise or not.”

How would the East Coast community of the future survive the worst effects of climate change?

This is a question Tolaga Bay resident Clive Bibby wants Gisborne District Council to investigate.

Mr Bibby provided a project on this topic to the council to be included in its Long Term Plan (LTP), where it could be visible at a national level and eligible for funding from the Government’s $1 billion Regional Development Fund.

“We should be prepared to design and execute a plan for restructuring infrastructure suitable for the needs of the community of the future.

“The number one responsibility of council is to keep the citizens of Tairawhiti safe both physically and economically against either current or predicted threats to our survival such as climate change.”

Mr Bibby wanted the investigation to focus on what a “post-climate change community” would look like, and how it would support itself economically “based on dramatically different income streams”.

“If the hill country livestock industry is reduced to a shadow of its former self, then we can plan for establishing new industries based on resources that have, up until now, been significantly under-utilised.”

Mr Bibby said for example, the Poverty Bay Flats could be developed by supplying enough water to support agriculture businesses to produce high-end crops in a non-pollutant way.

“Interestingly, this sort of development will probably be the way of the future anyway, irrespective of whether the negative effects of climate change materialise or not.”

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