Appeal on behalf of elderly

Wide-ranging submissions on the long-term plan

Wide-ranging submissions on the long-term plan

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THE elderly of Gisborne need to be listened to and respected, says Nona Aston.

This time representing Tairawhiti Positive Action Group, Mrs Aston made another heartfelt address during long-term-plan submissions to Gisborne district councillors.

The elderly had worked, paid taxes, raised children and provided many of the district’s volunteers, she said.

There were now 163 more people on the books of CCS.

“What is the future?

“It’s a tsunami.”

Would decisions made by the council be suitable for older people with a disability?

Mrs Aston said the council had discussed cycleway-driven changes to roading in Rutene Road near Dunblane Rest Home and Village with the manager — but not with residents whose driveways would be affected.

“We can still think and we have cars.

“Please speak to us.

“He manages our homes, he doesn’t manage our lives.”

Resident claims she was told if she complained about council-owned community units, they would be sold

She had been told that if she complained about the council-owned community units, they would be sold.

“You’re going to sell them. That’s blackmail, absolute emotional blackmail.

“It’s frightening.”

Mayor Meng Foon said he could dispel that myth.

“We are not selling them.’’

Trudel McKeown of Disabled Persons Assembly Tairawhiti, said Hauora Tairawhiti sent patients to the therapy pool at the Olympic Pool but was not on the reference group looking at the complex’s redevelopment.

The therapy pool did not offer dignity and privacy to users

The therapy pool did not offer dignity and privacy to users, including Gisborne Stroke Support, special needs students and others.

“Why put it out in the open where everyone can see us, yet you close off the learn-to-swim pool?”

“It doesn’t make sense.”

Ms McKeown suggested the therapy pool “be swapped” with the learn-to-swim pool.

Debbie Hutchings said Waikanae Surf Lifesaving Club endorsed the council’s preferred option for the upgrade, which includes a 50-metre pool.

Mrs Hutchings said the 50-metre pool would benefit her club. as members needed a “swimming foundation”.

Members would swim further than 50 metres, in demanding conditions, during rescues. More than 100 members swam at the pool.

Many community groups and sports clubs regularly used the facility.

Robyn Stuart-Kohn, of Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB), said changing criteria meant the organisation no longer received sufficient council funding to cover rent.

CAB funding is not enough to cover organisation's rent

The Gisborne branch paid more rent than other CAB branches, some of which were based in council-owned buildings.

Ms Stuart-Kohn asked for the council to investigate what the community could offer. Any premises had to provide privacy for CAB clientele, she said.

Property developer Tim Williams said it seemed unreasonable that developers had to pay development contributions in advance of any sections being built on.

Making the payment before getting title was “just not right”.

He had to upgrade some council infrastructure on a project, but still had to pay the full development contribution.

Mr Williams asked why the development contribution could not be paid when getting a building permit.

A caveat could be put on a section or “buyer beware”, like other constraints when buying a property.

Mr Williams said the council should talk to developers to make the development contribution “user-friendly”.

THE elderly of Gisborne need to be listened to and respected, says Nona Aston.

This time representing Tairawhiti Positive Action Group, Mrs Aston made another heartfelt address during long-term-plan submissions to Gisborne district councillors.

The elderly had worked, paid taxes, raised children and provided many of the district’s volunteers, she said.

There were now 163 more people on the books of CCS.

“What is the future?

“It’s a tsunami.”

Would decisions made by the council be suitable for older people with a disability?

Mrs Aston said the council had discussed cycleway-driven changes to roading in Rutene Road near Dunblane Rest Home and Village with the manager — but not with residents whose driveways would be affected.

“We can still think and we have cars.

“Please speak to us.

“He manages our homes, he doesn’t manage our lives.”

Resident claims she was told if she complained about council-owned community units, they would be sold

She had been told that if she complained about the council-owned community units, they would be sold.

“You’re going to sell them. That’s blackmail, absolute emotional blackmail.

“It’s frightening.”

Mayor Meng Foon said he could dispel that myth.

“We are not selling them.’’

Trudel McKeown of Disabled Persons Assembly Tairawhiti, said Hauora Tairawhiti sent patients to the therapy pool at the Olympic Pool but was not on the reference group looking at the complex’s redevelopment.

The therapy pool did not offer dignity and privacy to users

The therapy pool did not offer dignity and privacy to users, including Gisborne Stroke Support, special needs students and others.

“Why put it out in the open where everyone can see us, yet you close off the learn-to-swim pool?”

“It doesn’t make sense.”

Ms McKeown suggested the therapy pool “be swapped” with the learn-to-swim pool.

Debbie Hutchings said Waikanae Surf Lifesaving Club endorsed the council’s preferred option for the upgrade, which includes a 50-metre pool.

Mrs Hutchings said the 50-metre pool would benefit her club. as members needed a “swimming foundation”.

Members would swim further than 50 metres, in demanding conditions, during rescues. More than 100 members swam at the pool.

Many community groups and sports clubs regularly used the facility.

Robyn Stuart-Kohn, of Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB), said changing criteria meant the organisation no longer received sufficient council funding to cover rent.

CAB funding is not enough to cover organisation's rent

The Gisborne branch paid more rent than other CAB branches, some of which were based in council-owned buildings.

Ms Stuart-Kohn asked for the council to investigate what the community could offer. Any premises had to provide privacy for CAB clientele, she said.

Property developer Tim Williams said it seemed unreasonable that developers had to pay development contributions in advance of any sections being built on.

Making the payment before getting title was “just not right”.

He had to upgrade some council infrastructure on a project, but still had to pay the full development contribution.

Mr Williams asked why the development contribution could not be paid when getting a building permit.

A caveat could be put on a section or “buyer beware”, like other constraints when buying a property.

Mr Williams said the council should talk to developers to make the development contribution “user-friendly”.

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