Water strategy could be useful, councillors told

Medical officer of health Dr Bruce Duncan supports DrainWise

Medical officer of health Dr Bruce Duncan supports DrainWise

INTER-relationships in the water cycle — sea to rain and freshwater, to rivers and aquifers, suggest an over-arching strategy for managing water could be useful, Gisborne district councillors have heard.

Dr Bruce Duncan, Hauora Tairawhiti medical officer of health, told councillors during his long-term plan submission yesterday there were many linkages in “the whole of water’’, such as how treated wastewater could be used for irrigation.

It was good to hear horticulturist Rick Thorpe say in his earlier submission that he would use water from the wetland.

Scientific evidence supported the wetland, he said.

But it was disappointing that the long-term plan focused on micro-organisms when there was growing knowledge about micro-pollutants like plastics and other organic contaminants.

Deciding to only consider a wetland if a use could be found for the water, could lead to unachievably high standards being set — so the wetland might never be built.

There were opportunities for a joint approach on the Coast and in other unreticulated areas by offering technical support to volunteers responsible for providing drinking water.

A leadership group could include the council, iwi, supplier and user.

Support for removing human waste from city's rivers

Dr Duncan said he supported DrainWise and the need to remove human waste from the city’s rivers.

He would like to see a long-term goal — not necessarily within the time of the 10-year-plan — of removing human waste from rivers, rather than accepting that there would be discharges.

Noel Craft, representing Generation Zero and standing in for his daughter, said a deluge of rain two weeks ago left Wainui Stream blue-black and smelling of sewage.

“The fish were coming up to the edge and actually committing suicide —jumping out and flipping around.”

Two hours later it started to clear.

People walking along the beaches could see continuing degradation of the ocean.

“I believe the sand at Wainui is already discolouring from the continual sediment onslaught.”

Mr Craft said the forestry industry was “unbridled” in the way it operated.

“No one checks on them.’’

The country was not 100 percent pure, as claimed in tourism promotion campaigns.

“Speaking for the younger generation, we have to do everything we can to stop this degradation.”

INTER-relationships in the water cycle — sea to rain and freshwater, to rivers and aquifers, suggest an over-arching strategy for managing water could be useful, Gisborne district councillors have heard.

Dr Bruce Duncan, Hauora Tairawhiti medical officer of health, told councillors during his long-term plan submission yesterday there were many linkages in “the whole of water’’, such as how treated wastewater could be used for irrigation.

It was good to hear horticulturist Rick Thorpe say in his earlier submission that he would use water from the wetland.

Scientific evidence supported the wetland, he said.

But it was disappointing that the long-term plan focused on micro-organisms when there was growing knowledge about micro-pollutants like plastics and other organic contaminants.

Deciding to only consider a wetland if a use could be found for the water, could lead to unachievably high standards being set — so the wetland might never be built.

There were opportunities for a joint approach on the Coast and in other unreticulated areas by offering technical support to volunteers responsible for providing drinking water.

A leadership group could include the council, iwi, supplier and user.

Support for removing human waste from city's rivers

Dr Duncan said he supported DrainWise and the need to remove human waste from the city’s rivers.

He would like to see a long-term goal — not necessarily within the time of the 10-year-plan — of removing human waste from rivers, rather than accepting that there would be discharges.

Noel Craft, representing Generation Zero and standing in for his daughter, said a deluge of rain two weeks ago left Wainui Stream blue-black and smelling of sewage.

“The fish were coming up to the edge and actually committing suicide —jumping out and flipping around.”

Two hours later it started to clear.

People walking along the beaches could see continuing degradation of the ocean.

“I believe the sand at Wainui is already discolouring from the continual sediment onslaught.”

Mr Craft said the forestry industry was “unbridled” in the way it operated.

“No one checks on them.’’

The country was not 100 percent pure, as claimed in tourism promotion campaigns.

“Speaking for the younger generation, we have to do everything we can to stop this degradation.”

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