Exploring potential of dung beetles

A seminar will be held tomorrow to discuss the potential use of dung beetles to improve waterways in the region — targeting the waste that stock leave behind them.

It will be presented by head researcher Dr Shaun Forgie of Dung Beetle Innovations and Landcare Research.

“Nationally, sheep, cattle and horses produce over 100 million tonnes of dung a year,” a District Council spokeswoman said.

“If not carefully managed, it results in nutrient run-off into streams and rivers, while the dung that remains on pastures can cause stock infections or impact on pastoral growth.

“Research nationally and abroad has shown the humble dung beetle is a practical, sustainable and cost-effective way to mitigate the impacts of farming on the environment,” she said.

“The council has facilitated research into the use of dung beetles to improve our region’s waterways, starting with the seminar.”

Principal science adviser Murry Cave said the seminar would be of particular interest to pastoral farmers and land managers looking to improve pastoral quality, and manage nutrient run-off from their farms.

  • The free public seminar will be at the Gisborne District Council offices tomorrow at 1pm.

A seminar will be held tomorrow to discuss the potential use of dung beetles to improve waterways in the region — targeting the waste that stock leave behind them.

It will be presented by head researcher Dr Shaun Forgie of Dung Beetle Innovations and Landcare Research.

“Nationally, sheep, cattle and horses produce over 100 million tonnes of dung a year,” a District Council spokeswoman said.

“If not carefully managed, it results in nutrient run-off into streams and rivers, while the dung that remains on pastures can cause stock infections or impact on pastoral growth.

“Research nationally and abroad has shown the humble dung beetle is a practical, sustainable and cost-effective way to mitigate the impacts of farming on the environment,” she said.

“The council has facilitated research into the use of dung beetles to improve our region’s waterways, starting with the seminar.”

Principal science adviser Murry Cave said the seminar would be of particular interest to pastoral farmers and land managers looking to improve pastoral quality, and manage nutrient run-off from their farms.

  • The free public seminar will be at the Gisborne District Council offices tomorrow at 1pm.
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