Stream clean-up session on Sunday

Among the 24 volunteers who picked up litter, weeded and spread mulch as part of the Waikanae Stream community project in March were Katie Foxley, Meg Hills and Department of Conservation community ranger Trudi Ngawhare.
There is another clean-up on Sunday from 1pm to 3pm and volunteers are welcome. Picture supplied


Volunteers are invited to help clean up Waikanae Stream at a community working bee this Sunday.

Waikanae Stream care group organiser Jason Akuhata-Brown said weeding in March boosted native plant growth so the next stage is to filter run-off to the stream.

“The bank on the skatepark side of Waikanae Stream is now planted from Grey Street to Customhouse Street.

“We want to ensure those plants thrive. On the day, we will weed, spread mulch, pick up litter and do some planting in gaps.”

Koromiko plants have been donated by the Women’s Native Tree Project Trust.

“Koromiko have done well at this site,” said Mr Akuhata-Brown.

Kauri Forno, of the Women’s Native Tree Project Trust, is delighted to see how well plants, many of them donated by the trust, have grown.

She has also been involved in a Tairawhiti Enviroschools project starting at the other end of Waikanae Stream.

Enviroschools facilitator Kirsty Gaddum is co-ordinating the project based around the stream near Gisborne Airport.

“The project is called Wairestoration and involves high school students — working with advisers — learning how to do a range of jobs to help improve freshwater,” said Ms Forno.

“We have started waimonitoring (water testing) and waifencing and will move on to waiplanting and waimaintenance, which will involve weeding and animal pest control.

“We have support from the Eastland Group, Turanga Ararau and other local groups, who are helping our students.

“Gisborne Girls’ High School and Campion College students have been involved so far, and we see this as a brilliant long-term project for the awa and the young people involved,” said Ms Forno.

Mr Akuhata-Brown is also enthusiastic about Wairestoration as another contribution towards the long-term cleaning up of the stream.

“Over the years there have been many clean-ups and plantings by various groups along different sections of the awa.

“Now there is a real sense of people being on the job for the long haul.

“We’re very keen to see young people involved and going thorough practical training in how and why we do this mahi.

“We look forward to getting a good team to help on the day.”

Volunteers are asked to meet at the Skate Park to register and get information on the programme, which will run from 1pm to 3pm.

Tools, light gloves and rubbish bags will be provided, but extra wheelbarrows or rakes would be appreciated by organisers.

Volunteers are invited to help clean up Waikanae Stream at a community working bee this Sunday.

Waikanae Stream care group organiser Jason Akuhata-Brown said weeding in March boosted native plant growth so the next stage is to filter run-off to the stream.

“The bank on the skatepark side of Waikanae Stream is now planted from Grey Street to Customhouse Street.

“We want to ensure those plants thrive. On the day, we will weed, spread mulch, pick up litter and do some planting in gaps.”

Koromiko plants have been donated by the Women’s Native Tree Project Trust.

“Koromiko have done well at this site,” said Mr Akuhata-Brown.

Kauri Forno, of the Women’s Native Tree Project Trust, is delighted to see how well plants, many of them donated by the trust, have grown.

She has also been involved in a Tairawhiti Enviroschools project starting at the other end of Waikanae Stream.

Enviroschools facilitator Kirsty Gaddum is co-ordinating the project based around the stream near Gisborne Airport.

“The project is called Wairestoration and involves high school students — working with advisers — learning how to do a range of jobs to help improve freshwater,” said Ms Forno.

“We have started waimonitoring (water testing) and waifencing and will move on to waiplanting and waimaintenance, which will involve weeding and animal pest control.

“We have support from the Eastland Group, Turanga Ararau and other local groups, who are helping our students.

“Gisborne Girls’ High School and Campion College students have been involved so far, and we see this as a brilliant long-term project for the awa and the young people involved,” said Ms Forno.

Mr Akuhata-Brown is also enthusiastic about Wairestoration as another contribution towards the long-term cleaning up of the stream.

“Over the years there have been many clean-ups and plantings by various groups along different sections of the awa.

“Now there is a real sense of people being on the job for the long haul.

“We’re very keen to see young people involved and going thorough practical training in how and why we do this mahi.

“We look forward to getting a good team to help on the day.”

Volunteers are asked to meet at the Skate Park to register and get information on the programme, which will run from 1pm to 3pm.

Tools, light gloves and rubbish bags will be provided, but extra wheelbarrows or rakes would be appreciated by organisers.

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