Young Maori orators shine in competition

Four winners go on to national finals

Four winners go on to national finals

Manaia Aupouri
Sade Materoa Rewiri
Paora Whaanga-Gilbert
Paige Richter
Dean McKay
Janine Pere-Ruru
Junior Campbell
Kim Leckner
Lee Morton
Mat Boonen
Rick Harrison
Sapphire Barrett
Savine Radneva
Ted O'Rourke

The Tairawhiti Nga Manu Korero regional speech competition has a history of showcasing some of the finest young orators in the region — and this week’s event was no exception.

Four secondary school students were named as the best orators in their respective sections at Gisborne Girls’ High School on Wednesday.

They will go on to represent Tairawhiti at the national competition, which will be held in Gisborne at Showgrounds Park Event Centre (Houhoupiko) in September.

Nga Manu Korero is regarded as a pinnacle event in Maori secondary school education.

It is a platform for rangatahi Maori (young people) to have their say, and often gives an insight into future Maori leaders.

Some of our current Maori leaders have been past national winners, such as Derek Lardelli, Willie Te Aho and Vicky Wehi.

Subject matter is always of importance, and students often explore political and social themes.

This year’s regional winners were Manaia Aupouri of Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Nga Uri a Maui, for the Pei Te Hurinui Jones Trophy (senior te reo Maori speech); Materoa Rewiri of Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Horouta Wananga, for the Korimako Trophy (senior English speech); Paora Whaanga-Gilbert of TKKM o Nga Uri a Maui, for the Rawhiti Ihaka Trophy (junior te reo Maori speech); and Paige Richter of Lytton High School, for the Ta Turi Kara/Sir Turi Carroll Trophy (junior English speech).

Judge of the Pei Te Hurinui Jones section Ruth Smith said she was impressed with the quality of senior Maori speakers in the competition this year.

“It was a really close call in the top three and any one of those speakers would have been an exemplary selection to represent our region at the nationals.

“The quality of language that was presented has improved immensely over the years. Our speakers are getting better and better. The performance aspect of the speeches was also a highlight for me, with some being absolutely captivating.

“As a judge, if you’re putting your pen down to be engaged in what is being said, then you know that the speaker is something special.

“All credit to the teachers who have been supporting their students. But the speakers themselves, should be celebrated — they are young, exceptionally talented and well informed, and it was an absolute honour to listen to their korero.”

Judge of the Rawhiti Ihaka section Joe Pihema shared those sentiments.

“The standard of Maori junior speakers continues to rise and the gap between senior and juniors is closing.

“Paora Whaanga was a very impressive winner, showing his command of the reo and his understanding. His presence captured the judges and he will be a strong contender at the nationals.

“I believe Tairawhiti will be well represented this year at the nationals as the calibre of speakers is very impressive.

“The language was the biggest winner on the day, with a strong showing from all orators.”

The Tairawhiti Nga Manu Korero regional speech competition has a history of showcasing some of the finest young orators in the region — and this week’s event was no exception.

Four secondary school students were named as the best orators in their respective sections at Gisborne Girls’ High School on Wednesday.

They will go on to represent Tairawhiti at the national competition, which will be held in Gisborne at Showgrounds Park Event Centre (Houhoupiko) in September.

Nga Manu Korero is regarded as a pinnacle event in Maori secondary school education.

It is a platform for rangatahi Maori (young people) to have their say, and often gives an insight into future Maori leaders.

Some of our current Maori leaders have been past national winners, such as Derek Lardelli, Willie Te Aho and Vicky Wehi.

Subject matter is always of importance, and students often explore political and social themes.

This year’s regional winners were Manaia Aupouri of Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Nga Uri a Maui, for the Pei Te Hurinui Jones Trophy (senior te reo Maori speech); Materoa Rewiri of Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Horouta Wananga, for the Korimako Trophy (senior English speech); Paora Whaanga-Gilbert of TKKM o Nga Uri a Maui, for the Rawhiti Ihaka Trophy (junior te reo Maori speech); and Paige Richter of Lytton High School, for the Ta Turi Kara/Sir Turi Carroll Trophy (junior English speech).

Judge of the Pei Te Hurinui Jones section Ruth Smith said she was impressed with the quality of senior Maori speakers in the competition this year.

“It was a really close call in the top three and any one of those speakers would have been an exemplary selection to represent our region at the nationals.

“The quality of language that was presented has improved immensely over the years. Our speakers are getting better and better. The performance aspect of the speeches was also a highlight for me, with some being absolutely captivating.

“As a judge, if you’re putting your pen down to be engaged in what is being said, then you know that the speaker is something special.

“All credit to the teachers who have been supporting their students. But the speakers themselves, should be celebrated — they are young, exceptionally talented and well informed, and it was an absolute honour to listen to their korero.”

Judge of the Rawhiti Ihaka section Joe Pihema shared those sentiments.

“The standard of Maori junior speakers continues to rise and the gap between senior and juniors is closing.

“Paora Whaanga was a very impressive winner, showing his command of the reo and his understanding. His presence captured the judges and he will be a strong contender at the nationals.

“I believe Tairawhiti will be well represented this year at the nationals as the calibre of speakers is very impressive.

“The language was the biggest winner on the day, with a strong showing from all orators.”

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