Any ideas for using old wharf shed?

The inner harbour wharf shed is owned by Gisborne District Council but it is unsure what to do with it.

The council would like community feedback. It is on Eastland Port land and the port wants it moved within the next six to 12 months.

Gisborne District Council bought the building in 2016 for $1. But its restoration and relocation could cost anywhere from $47,000 to $1 million, which most councillors agreed put it in the “nice to haves” basket but not a priority.

There was no budget for it.

The three-storey structure is the only building left from it’s time. Built in 1887, it is described as in “fair condition” and not in active use.

A report from November 2016 by a conservational architecture company called archifact states the Wharf Shed’s historical significance is tied to its association with the early development of Gisborne Harbour and port. It is not included on the New Zealand Heritage List but recommendations have been made for it to be listed as a category B historic place in the Gisborne District Plan.

The Future Tairawhiti meeting of district councillors last week discussed options, which included asking the community for feedback on what to do given there was no money for GDC to start any project on it.

Councillor Larry Foster was the most enthusiastic about its restoration. He felt it would be a great tourism opportunity.

Councillor Pat Seymour said it was an important building but it needed to be done properly. It would not matter if it sat there for another year, she said.

Councillor Brian Wilson also thought they should “park it up”.

He could not get excited about it being a great historic building to preserve, and if it was being discussed as a tourism venture, what about the Churchill Park “jailhouse”? Nothing had been done with it, he said.

Councillor Shannon Dowsing said he did not believe it should be a council project. He loved the building personally and if it was on his land he would do it up for Grand Designs. But he agreed it also came under the “nice to haves”.

Councillor Andy Cranston said it could be that someone in the community would come through with an idea they could fund themselves.

The inner harbour wharf shed is owned by Gisborne District Council but it is unsure what to do with it.

The council would like community feedback. It is on Eastland Port land and the port wants it moved within the next six to 12 months.

Gisborne District Council bought the building in 2016 for $1. But its restoration and relocation could cost anywhere from $47,000 to $1 million, which most councillors agreed put it in the “nice to haves” basket but not a priority.

There was no budget for it.

The three-storey structure is the only building left from it’s time. Built in 1887, it is described as in “fair condition” and not in active use.

A report from November 2016 by a conservational architecture company called archifact states the Wharf Shed’s historical significance is tied to its association with the early development of Gisborne Harbour and port. It is not included on the New Zealand Heritage List but recommendations have been made for it to be listed as a category B historic place in the Gisborne District Plan.

The Future Tairawhiti meeting of district councillors last week discussed options, which included asking the community for feedback on what to do given there was no money for GDC to start any project on it.

Councillor Larry Foster was the most enthusiastic about its restoration. He felt it would be a great tourism opportunity.

Councillor Pat Seymour said it was an important building but it needed to be done properly. It would not matter if it sat there for another year, she said.

Councillor Brian Wilson also thought they should “park it up”.

He could not get excited about it being a great historic building to preserve, and if it was being discussed as a tourism venture, what about the Churchill Park “jailhouse”? Nothing had been done with it, he said.

Councillor Shannon Dowsing said he did not believe it should be a council project. He loved the building personally and if it was on his land he would do it up for Grand Designs. But he agreed it also came under the “nice to haves”.

Councillor Andy Cranston said it could be that someone in the community would come through with an idea they could fund themselves.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    ​Do you support nurses in their rejection of pay and working condition offers, and their plan to strike twice next month?