Finding inspiration behind the AIMS Games for 11 to 13-year-olds

Students from 319 New Zealand, Cook Island, Tongan, Samoan and Australian schools will compete in September

Students from 319 New Zealand, Cook Island, Tongan, Samoan and Australian schools will compete in September

Aiming hight: Cameraman James Turnbull (left) films AIMS Games, tournament director Vicki Semple as she chats to Gisborne Intermediate deputy principal Brendon Hart. The small film crew is in search of inspirational stories about school children’s involvement in the annual sports championships games for the documentary, The Road to the AIMS Games. Picture by Liam Clayton

A film crew visited Gisborne and the East Coast last week to shoot footage for a documentary about the annual sporting championships known as the AIMS Games.

The sporting championships give 11 to 13-year-olds an opportunity to participate in 22 different sports and are seen as a potential pathway to sporting achievement.

AIMS Games tournament director Vicki Semple and the crew visited Gisborne Intermediate School and Tolaga Bay Area School to shoot footage for The Road to the AIMS Games.

Mrs Semple also talked to Waikanae Surf Life Saving Club coach Cory Hutchings and young surf lifesavers who will compete in the event.

“We look for inspirational stories of athletes who go the extra mile to get to AIMS,” said Ms Semple.

“Tolaga Bay Area School brings a badminton team to the AIMS Games. They made friends with kids from the Cook Islands during one tournament, so the Tolaga Bay kids went on a badminton exchange trip to the Cook Islands.”

Gisborne Intermediate School sends a hip-hop and aerobics team, who usually do “pretty well”, said deputy principal and head of sports Brendon Hart.

Gisborne flies under the radar in terms of sports achievement but the region produces top athletes such as former

Gisborne Intermediate students Olivia Corrin, Briana Irving and Lachie Falloon, who now compete on the international stage, were AIMS Games gold medallists.

“Our hip-hop and aerobics kids usually finish in the top 10,” said Mr Hart.

“We have a large number of kids who do well at multisport and Nathan Trowell and Dylan Foster did well at indoor bowls last year.”

Students from 319 New Zealand, Cook Island, Tongan, Samoan and Australian schools will compete in the games in September.

The Road to the AIMS Games crew began filming in Tonga, where badminton players and swimmers are preparing for the 2018 games.

“The swimmers don’t have a pool, so they train in the naval basin in the harbour,” said Ms Semple.

The six-part web series of The Road to the AIMS Games will screen via the games’ Facebook page in the build-up to the games in September.

A film crew visited Gisborne and the East Coast last week to shoot footage for a documentary about the annual sporting championships known as the AIMS Games.

The sporting championships give 11 to 13-year-olds an opportunity to participate in 22 different sports and are seen as a potential pathway to sporting achievement.

AIMS Games tournament director Vicki Semple and the crew visited Gisborne Intermediate School and Tolaga Bay Area School to shoot footage for The Road to the AIMS Games.

Mrs Semple also talked to Waikanae Surf Life Saving Club coach Cory Hutchings and young surf lifesavers who will compete in the event.

“We look for inspirational stories of athletes who go the extra mile to get to AIMS,” said Ms Semple.

“Tolaga Bay Area School brings a badminton team to the AIMS Games. They made friends with kids from the Cook Islands during one tournament, so the Tolaga Bay kids went on a badminton exchange trip to the Cook Islands.”

Gisborne Intermediate School sends a hip-hop and aerobics team, who usually do “pretty well”, said deputy principal and head of sports Brendon Hart.

Gisborne flies under the radar in terms of sports achievement but the region produces top athletes such as former

Gisborne Intermediate students Olivia Corrin, Briana Irving and Lachie Falloon, who now compete on the international stage, were AIMS Games gold medallists.

“Our hip-hop and aerobics kids usually finish in the top 10,” said Mr Hart.

“We have a large number of kids who do well at multisport and Nathan Trowell and Dylan Foster did well at indoor bowls last year.”

Students from 319 New Zealand, Cook Island, Tongan, Samoan and Australian schools will compete in the games in September.

The Road to the AIMS Games crew began filming in Tonga, where badminton players and swimmers are preparing for the 2018 games.

“The swimmers don’t have a pool, so they train in the naval basin in the harbour,” said Ms Semple.

The six-part web series of The Road to the AIMS Games will screen via the games’ Facebook page in the build-up to the games in September.

More than 10,000 competitors

• A record 10,851 intermediate-age competitors have entered the 2018 games.

• Rock climbing has been included this year as one of the 22 sporting codes.

• This year, 83 new schools from Tonga, Samoa, the Cook Islands, Australia and NZ raise the number of schools involved in the games to more than 320.

• Interest in codes such as climbing, futsal, water polo and indoor bowls is growing as traditional mainstream sports for Kiwi kids change, says tournament director Vicki Semple.

• With 124 teams this year, netball remains the largest code.

• A record 265 multisport competitors have entered, along with 827 cross country runners and 372 swimmers. Gymnastics will have 500 competitors for the first time.

• Para-athletes will compete for the second year in swimming and cross country.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you think the road over Titirangi/Kaiti Hill should be one-way to make it safer for pedestrians?​