Marae’s new dining hall opened

Solar energy adopted in new building.

Solar energy adopted in new building.

NEW DINING HALL: The new hall Rongomaiwaiata was filled with whanau and visitors from throughout the district. The wharekai (dining room), pictured, was named after Rongomaiwaiata, the wife of Rangiwaho. Pictures by Ali Maynard
The wharenui (meeting house), pictured, represents the ancestor Rangiwaho.

The whanau of Rangiwaho Marae have opened their new wharekai, or dining room, named after the ancestress Rongomaiwaiata.

Rangiwaho Marae is 36km south of Gisborne at Bartletts.

A special opening for the wharekai was held on Saturday, with a karakia dawn service, a mihi whakatau (welcoming service), followed by a hakari (feast).

Rangiwaho Marae trustee Kaye Robin said it was a humbling occasion for the hau kaenga (home people), who had been looking forward to the opening day for some time.

“Rangiwaho is our ancestor. The name of the marae is Rangiwaho and the name of the meeting house is also Rangiwaho. The wharenui was opened in October 2012.

“Rongomaiwaiata was the wife of Rangiwaho, and it was appropriate that the wharekai be named after her.

“Her whakapapa links us to Ruapani, Rongowhakaata and Kahungunu, and her brothers link us to Ngati Porou and Hauiti.

“Through her, she brings all the whakapapa lines of Tairawhiti here. That is something really important to acknowledge, especially as we are the gateway to Turanga.”

The build for the wharekai began in October 2017. Something that sets Rangiwaho apart from many marae is that it is a solar energy marae, said Ms Robin.

“We got funding from Eastland Community Trust to set ourselves up as a solar energy marae.

“In our minds we wanted to be affordable and self-sustainable. We wanted to be used. We wanted our whanau to have access.

“We’re excited because this brings new possibilities and new ideas. This is not only a cultural base but we see the potential to also make this an economic base for our whanau.

“But there has been a lot of koha, mahi aroha (work done for love) from whanau and businesses to make this all happen.”

Rangiwaho is traditionally known as a marae of the Ringatu faith, founded by the ancestor Te Kooti Arikirangi Te Turuki.

“We had a Ringatu karakia to get the build under way and we had a Ringatu karakia on Saturday morning for the opening.”

  • Next month, the marae will host the 150-year commemorations of the return of Te Kooti and more than 300 followers to the district in 1868 after they had been exiled to Wharekauri, the Chatham Islands.

They arrived at Whareongaonga aboard the supply ship, the Rifleman, which they seized after escaping from the islands.

The whanau of Rangiwaho Marae have opened their new wharekai, or dining room, named after the ancestress Rongomaiwaiata.

Rangiwaho Marae is 36km south of Gisborne at Bartletts.

A special opening for the wharekai was held on Saturday, with a karakia dawn service, a mihi whakatau (welcoming service), followed by a hakari (feast).

Rangiwaho Marae trustee Kaye Robin said it was a humbling occasion for the hau kaenga (home people), who had been looking forward to the opening day for some time.

“Rangiwaho is our ancestor. The name of the marae is Rangiwaho and the name of the meeting house is also Rangiwaho. The wharenui was opened in October 2012.

“Rongomaiwaiata was the wife of Rangiwaho, and it was appropriate that the wharekai be named after her.

“Her whakapapa links us to Ruapani, Rongowhakaata and Kahungunu, and her brothers link us to Ngati Porou and Hauiti.

“Through her, she brings all the whakapapa lines of Tairawhiti here. That is something really important to acknowledge, especially as we are the gateway to Turanga.”

The build for the wharekai began in October 2017. Something that sets Rangiwaho apart from many marae is that it is a solar energy marae, said Ms Robin.

“We got funding from Eastland Community Trust to set ourselves up as a solar energy marae.

“In our minds we wanted to be affordable and self-sustainable. We wanted to be used. We wanted our whanau to have access.

“We’re excited because this brings new possibilities and new ideas. This is not only a cultural base but we see the potential to also make this an economic base for our whanau.

“But there has been a lot of koha, mahi aroha (work done for love) from whanau and businesses to make this all happen.”

Rangiwaho is traditionally known as a marae of the Ringatu faith, founded by the ancestor Te Kooti Arikirangi Te Turuki.

“We had a Ringatu karakia to get the build under way and we had a Ringatu karakia on Saturday morning for the opening.”

  • Next month, the marae will host the 150-year commemorations of the return of Te Kooti and more than 300 followers to the district in 1868 after they had been exiled to Wharekauri, the Chatham Islands.

They arrived at Whareongaonga aboard the supply ship, the Rifleman, which they seized after escaping from the islands.

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Mary Harris - 4 months ago
I found this article very interesting as Te Kooti took my great-grandfather's boat The Rifleman from the Chathams.

Karen Pewhairangi - 4 months ago
Tenei te tirahou, tenei haere mai nei
Na te rongopai, na te rangimarie
Tenei te mihi nui ki nga uri o Rangiwaho,
ka mau o koutou kaha, o koutou wehi!!!

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