Who is killing the cats?

Antifreeze poisoned her pets.

Antifreeze poisoned her pets.

Bonnie is recuperating at home after suspected antifreeze poisoning. It has been a rough few years for her owner, who has lost four cats over the past three years — three of them killed by ingesting antifreeze. Picture supplied

After the death of four cats in three years, a Gisborne woman has come to the conclusion that their deaths are more than just a coincidence.

Today a fifth cat recuperates at home after suspected antifreeze poisoning — the same substance that killed three of her other cats, while the fourth simply disappeared and never came home.

The woman says she is heartbroken, not only to lose four of her pets but “it’s a horrible way for them to die”.

There is only a two-hour window to treat a cat that has ingested antifreeze, otherwise the damage to the kidneys is fatal, she said.

In July 2015, two of her cats died on the same day . . . Fergus, and Antonio — a rescue cat that had bad eyesight.

Last week two more cats, Bella and Bonnie, also became sick.

Bella died last week and Bonnie spent a week at the vet.

On top of this, last November her son’s cat disappeared from her central-city home as well.

All cats were well cared for, beautiful healthy animals who had all been de-sexed, she said.

“I tried to hold on to the belief it was accidental — that maybe someone drained antifreeze out of a car or something and had not disposed of it properly.

“I had no proof either way and have just assumed people would be careful with something so deadly.”

There have been no nasty notes or comments from neighbours, so she really has no idea who could be doing this.

But one thing is certain — after four similar deaths of her much-loved pets, she now believes it is deliberate.

Three were diagnosed with antifreeze poisoning, two were never found — but because Antonio disappeared the same day that Fergus died from antifreeze poisoning, it is assumed he did too.

That day in July 2015, she woke up to Fergus not looking well. He and Antonio always spent the night on her bed, she said.

Antonio was not around, which was unusual. When Antonio returned, he did not eat his breakfast — she thought it weird, as with his poor eyesight he had the nose of a bloodhound and a hunger from being a rescue cat, she said.

When Antonio left through the cat door, he was never seen again.

The same day, Fergus was taken to the vet, diagnosed as having ingested antifreeze and could not be saved.

“It broke my heart”

She is very hopeful that Bonnie will pull through because she is eating and is brighter than the others were.

Her kidneys were damaged but it is hoped the damage was halted.

After the death of four cats in three years, a Gisborne woman has come to the conclusion that their deaths are more than just a coincidence.

Today a fifth cat recuperates at home after suspected antifreeze poisoning — the same substance that killed three of her other cats, while the fourth simply disappeared and never came home.

The woman says she is heartbroken, not only to lose four of her pets but “it’s a horrible way for them to die”.

There is only a two-hour window to treat a cat that has ingested antifreeze, otherwise the damage to the kidneys is fatal, she said.

In July 2015, two of her cats died on the same day . . . Fergus, and Antonio — a rescue cat that had bad eyesight.

Last week two more cats, Bella and Bonnie, also became sick.

Bella died last week and Bonnie spent a week at the vet.

On top of this, last November her son’s cat disappeared from her central-city home as well.

All cats were well cared for, beautiful healthy animals who had all been de-sexed, she said.

“I tried to hold on to the belief it was accidental — that maybe someone drained antifreeze out of a car or something and had not disposed of it properly.

“I had no proof either way and have just assumed people would be careful with something so deadly.”

There have been no nasty notes or comments from neighbours, so she really has no idea who could be doing this.

But one thing is certain — after four similar deaths of her much-loved pets, she now believes it is deliberate.

Three were diagnosed with antifreeze poisoning, two were never found — but because Antonio disappeared the same day that Fergus died from antifreeze poisoning, it is assumed he did too.

That day in July 2015, she woke up to Fergus not looking well. He and Antonio always spent the night on her bed, she said.

Antonio was not around, which was unusual. When Antonio returned, he did not eat his breakfast — she thought it weird, as with his poor eyesight he had the nose of a bloodhound and a hunger from being a rescue cat, she said.

When Antonio left through the cat door, he was never seen again.

The same day, Fergus was taken to the vet, diagnosed as having ingested antifreeze and could not be saved.

“It broke my heart”

She is very hopeful that Bonnie will pull through because she is eating and is brighter than the others were.

Her kidneys were damaged but it is hoped the damage was halted.

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Tom Wilkie, Perth - 10 months ago
Kill all roaming cats as they kill the native species. Some owners are even proud when their cat brings a dead or dying bird to the house.

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