Anger issues led to assault at party

A man who broke a stranger’s nose and chipped his teeth at a party has been sentenced to 12 months intensive supervision and 90 hours community work.

Counsel Doug Rishworth had sought a sentence with a focus on rehabilitation as the best way to deal with a young man yet to learn how to manage his anger. It was likely to have the best long-term outcome for the community, he said.

Lucky Tamaia Campbell, 20, was sentenced by Judge Warren Cathcart for the November offence. The work sentence was deferred until later in the year to allow Campbell to attend a residential drug rehabilitation programme.

Campbell was initially charged with the three strikes offence of injuring with intent to injure but police agreed to reduce it to Crimes Act assault. Mr Rishworth told Judge Cathcart there was no evidential basis for the more serious charge.

The incident resulted in serious consequences but lacked necessary intent. Campbell had not expected his actions to cause the outcome.

Campbell approached the other man, claiming to be the rightful owner of a speaker the man and his friends brought to the party. The man laughed at the suggestion. Campbell punched him twice in the cheek with a closed fist, causing him to fall to the ground.

The complainant received hospital treatment that night for a broken nose, black eye, chipped teeth, and various cuts and scratches to his mouth and lip. He suffered ongoing headaches.

Campbell told police he was drunk.

The sentence also covered two other unrelated incidents — one in March involving another stranger, this time a woman, who tried to intervene when she saw Campbell in his car waving a large hunting knife at a group of males in Carnarvon Street.

Campbell threatened her and the males who, he later told police, he suspected of looking into his car when he was at a gym.

He pleaded guilty in relation to that incident to threatening behaviour and possession of an offensive weapon. The judge ordered the knife to be destroyed.

The other incident was in January and resulted in a charge of wilful damage, which Campbell also admitted.

He used a plank to smash windows in a car on Endcliffe Road. Campbell claimed his uncle’s caravan was stolen by the owner of the car.

Mr Rishworth said the residential treatment programme was as restrictive as imprisonment, with a duration of anywhere between three and five months. If successful, it would not only benefit Campbell and his family but also the wider community.

Campbell would be forced to confront the underlying issues to his offending.

He lacked the ability to manage his anger, was looking for his identity, trying to impress, and generally making a real nuisance of himself, Mr Rishworth said.

Judge Cathcart noted the “dramatic” reduction to the charge related to the partygoer’s injuries but accepted Mr Rishworth’s submissions about it.

The judge said he was loath to imprison someone so young and recognised it would be a step backwards for Campbell. But he warned him this was a one-off opportunity.

Any re-offence involving violence and Campbell could expect to be jailed.

A man who broke a stranger’s nose and chipped his teeth at a party has been sentenced to 12 months intensive supervision and 90 hours community work.

Counsel Doug Rishworth had sought a sentence with a focus on rehabilitation as the best way to deal with a young man yet to learn how to manage his anger. It was likely to have the best long-term outcome for the community, he said.

Lucky Tamaia Campbell, 20, was sentenced by Judge Warren Cathcart for the November offence. The work sentence was deferred until later in the year to allow Campbell to attend a residential drug rehabilitation programme.

Campbell was initially charged with the three strikes offence of injuring with intent to injure but police agreed to reduce it to Crimes Act assault. Mr Rishworth told Judge Cathcart there was no evidential basis for the more serious charge.

The incident resulted in serious consequences but lacked necessary intent. Campbell had not expected his actions to cause the outcome.

Campbell approached the other man, claiming to be the rightful owner of a speaker the man and his friends brought to the party. The man laughed at the suggestion. Campbell punched him twice in the cheek with a closed fist, causing him to fall to the ground.

The complainant received hospital treatment that night for a broken nose, black eye, chipped teeth, and various cuts and scratches to his mouth and lip. He suffered ongoing headaches.

Campbell told police he was drunk.

The sentence also covered two other unrelated incidents — one in March involving another stranger, this time a woman, who tried to intervene when she saw Campbell in his car waving a large hunting knife at a group of males in Carnarvon Street.

Campbell threatened her and the males who, he later told police, he suspected of looking into his car when he was at a gym.

He pleaded guilty in relation to that incident to threatening behaviour and possession of an offensive weapon. The judge ordered the knife to be destroyed.

The other incident was in January and resulted in a charge of wilful damage, which Campbell also admitted.

He used a plank to smash windows in a car on Endcliffe Road. Campbell claimed his uncle’s caravan was stolen by the owner of the car.

Mr Rishworth said the residential treatment programme was as restrictive as imprisonment, with a duration of anywhere between three and five months. If successful, it would not only benefit Campbell and his family but also the wider community.

Campbell would be forced to confront the underlying issues to his offending.

He lacked the ability to manage his anger, was looking for his identity, trying to impress, and generally making a real nuisance of himself, Mr Rishworth said.

Judge Cathcart noted the “dramatic” reduction to the charge related to the partygoer’s injuries but accepted Mr Rishworth’s submissions about it.

The judge said he was loath to imprison someone so young and recognised it would be a step backwards for Campbell. But he warned him this was a one-off opportunity.

Any re-offence involving violence and Campbell could expect to be jailed.

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