Hard-hitting talk grabs attention at workshop

Mike King speaks to Juken New Zealand workers.

Mike King speaks to Juken New Zealand workers.

ADDRESSING HEALTH AND SAFETY IN FORESTRY: National advocate for mental health and suicide prevention Mike King talked to Juken New Zealand contractors, employees and sub-contractors at the Cosmopolitan Club this week. From left are Matt Kain, Tony Crosswell, Dan Ferguson, Mike King, JNL general manager Dave Hilliard, Sam Hudson, Blake Walsh and Danny Drummond. Picture by Paul Rickard
Mike King.

A “punchy presentation” by mental health advocate Mike King captured everyone’s attention at a workshop for forestry staff this week.

Juken New Zealand East Coast forest manager Dylan Foster says JNL takes health, safety and the environment seriously.

“Every year we hold a safe start meeting and a second mid-year safety meeting with all employees that work within our forests. We use these meetings to set goals.”

It is not just direct staff involved. Within JNL there are many different employment situations such as contractors, employees and sub-contractors.

“We view ourselves as one large family and treat each other likewise.

“JNL tasks everyone from the forest floor all the way to the manager with health, safety and environment initiatives to create a better result for us all.

“Everyone is involved in the process,” said Mr Foster.

One initiative is Manaakitangata — “the process of showing respect, generosity and care for others.”

To set this in physical terms, Mr Foster said JNL embarked on a theme of “people working for us will come under our full protection to ensure they are healthy and fully equipped, mentally and physically, to work safely in our business, and we will provide them with tools, encouragement, training and discipline to do so”.

“This philosophy extends not only to our wider workforce but directly back to our families as well.”

At this week’s safety meeting, Tina Drummond, from Work Wellbeing Solutions, talked to staff about the importance of looking after themselves through proper hydration and nutrition.

“She also covered the risks imposed on our workers within a new forestry environment, where rapidly-introduced mechanisation increased our level of safety but had potential health issues.”

JNL then looked to mental health and has introduced Employment Assistance Programmes for forestry employees.

“This encompasses everyone working within our forests,” said Mr Foster “This is where Mike King (national advocate for mental health and suicide prevention) came in.

“We understood the importance of the Employment Assistance Programmes to workers but needed the right way to launch it to our wider JNL group,” said Mr Foster.

“Mike’s punchy presentation captured everyone’s attention right from the start and the feedback from our workforce has been 100 percent positive to the presentation and the approach JNL has taken for all its employees.

“At JNL it is Manaakitangata — we stand in the gap, we look after our mates and our families.”

A “punchy presentation” by mental health advocate Mike King captured everyone’s attention at a workshop for forestry staff this week.

Juken New Zealand East Coast forest manager Dylan Foster says JNL takes health, safety and the environment seriously.

“Every year we hold a safe start meeting and a second mid-year safety meeting with all employees that work within our forests. We use these meetings to set goals.”

It is not just direct staff involved. Within JNL there are many different employment situations such as contractors, employees and sub-contractors.

“We view ourselves as one large family and treat each other likewise.

“JNL tasks everyone from the forest floor all the way to the manager with health, safety and environment initiatives to create a better result for us all.

“Everyone is involved in the process,” said Mr Foster.

One initiative is Manaakitangata — “the process of showing respect, generosity and care for others.”

To set this in physical terms, Mr Foster said JNL embarked on a theme of “people working for us will come under our full protection to ensure they are healthy and fully equipped, mentally and physically, to work safely in our business, and we will provide them with tools, encouragement, training and discipline to do so”.

“This philosophy extends not only to our wider workforce but directly back to our families as well.”

At this week’s safety meeting, Tina Drummond, from Work Wellbeing Solutions, talked to staff about the importance of looking after themselves through proper hydration and nutrition.

“She also covered the risks imposed on our workers within a new forestry environment, where rapidly-introduced mechanisation increased our level of safety but had potential health issues.”

JNL then looked to mental health and has introduced Employment Assistance Programmes for forestry employees.

“This encompasses everyone working within our forests,” said Mr Foster “This is where Mike King (national advocate for mental health and suicide prevention) came in.

“We understood the importance of the Employment Assistance Programmes to workers but needed the right way to launch it to our wider JNL group,” said Mr Foster.

“Mike’s punchy presentation captured everyone’s attention right from the start and the feedback from our workforce has been 100 percent positive to the presentation and the approach JNL has taken for all its employees.

“At JNL it is Manaakitangata — we stand in the gap, we look after our mates and our families.”

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