From Midway to Mahia via Olympic pool

Participants can swim, use flippers or walk the distance

Participants can swim, use flippers or walk the distance

IF I CAN, YOU CAN: Tess McCormick clocked up 310km in the Swim The Distance Challenge last year. The 2018 edition starts on August 1. Herald file picture

Spring arrives in September and by then you could be in great shape from having tackled the annual Swim the Distance Challenge.

The 45.5km distance swim from Midway to Mahia and back is done in the Olympic Pool, not the ocean.

Participants can swim, use flippers or walk the distance.

If this distance is too much, participants can tackle shorter challenges such as the 14km swim equivalent from Midway to Tatapouri and back or a return swim to Manutuke.

“Most people will find they go above and beyond what they thought they could do,” says Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti community events adviser Debbie Hutchings.

“Some of the shorter distance indicators we’ve provided help people to try to achieve that goal.”

The pool-based challenge is often a shared experience. People like to talk with others about how far they have swum and their goals and this creates a social atmosphere, says Ms Hutchings.

“How far have you managed to get so far is a conversation starter and motivator. It’s enjoyable to share the journey. It’s about people achieving more than they thought they could.”

This year’s Swim the Distance Challenge includes an aquafitness option. One 45-minute aquafitness class at the pool counts as the equivalent of a one-kilometre swim. People who would like to take the aquafitness option and register for the challenge can join the aquafitness classes at a reduced cost. This also gives them access to regular swimming.

The 2018 Swim the Distance Challenge runs from August 1 to September 30.

Registration forms are available from Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti and the Olympic Pool Complex.

Visit Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti’s website to find out more and download a registration form.

Spring arrives in September and by then you could be in great shape from having tackled the annual Swim the Distance Challenge.

The 45.5km distance swim from Midway to Mahia and back is done in the Olympic Pool, not the ocean.

Participants can swim, use flippers or walk the distance.

If this distance is too much, participants can tackle shorter challenges such as the 14km swim equivalent from Midway to Tatapouri and back or a return swim to Manutuke.

“Most people will find they go above and beyond what they thought they could do,” says Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti community events adviser Debbie Hutchings.

“Some of the shorter distance indicators we’ve provided help people to try to achieve that goal.”

The pool-based challenge is often a shared experience. People like to talk with others about how far they have swum and their goals and this creates a social atmosphere, says Ms Hutchings.

“How far have you managed to get so far is a conversation starter and motivator. It’s enjoyable to share the journey. It’s about people achieving more than they thought they could.”

This year’s Swim the Distance Challenge includes an aquafitness option. One 45-minute aquafitness class at the pool counts as the equivalent of a one-kilometre swim. People who would like to take the aquafitness option and register for the challenge can join the aquafitness classes at a reduced cost. This also gives them access to regular swimming.

The 2018 Swim the Distance Challenge runs from August 1 to September 30.

Registration forms are available from Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti and the Olympic Pool Complex.

Visit Sport Gisborne Tairawhiti’s website to find out more and download a registration form.

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