It takes a village to raise a smile

Team effort in a jar.

Team effort in a jar.

THANK YOU RYMAN HEALTHCARE: Alzheimers Gisborne presented residents and staff at Ryman Healthcare’s Kiri Te Kanawa retirement village with a “Certificate of Awesomeness” this week. The certificate was a show of gratitude after $11,700 was donated to Alzheimers Gisborne. Ryman chooses a charity each year and villages fundraise for that one organisation. Last year it was Alzheimers NZ and nationwide $390,000 was given to the charity and split among the branches. In front are Kiri Te Kanawa village manager Neville Parkinson, Alzheimers Gisborne manager Janet Willson and village resident John Bayley, whose wife Frances makes the preserves. At the back, from left, are Sherwood Club supervisor Jennifer Holloway, Kiri Te Kanawa sales adviser Pip Griffin and Alzheimers Gisborne community co-ordinator Cheryl Morley. Picture by Rebecca Grunwell

Pickles, preserves and jams sold at Ryman Healthcare’s retirement village have many hands contributing to their success.

Call it a team effort in a jar.

Hand-made by Frances Bayley, a resident at Kiri Te Kanawa retirement village, all ingredients are donated, people pitch in for power, then there are the people who buy them.

Sales of the preserves, combined with raffles and other fundraisers, mean village residents were able to donate $11,700 to the Gisborne Alzheimers Society.

Alzheimers New Zealand was Ryman’s chosen charity for 2017 and every cent raised around their retirement villages in New Zealand was matched dollar-for-dollar by Ryman’s head office.

It amounted to $390,000 for Alzheimers NZ, of which $11,700 went directly to the Gisborne branch.

It was absolutely “mind-blowing” to get a big amount like that in one hit, said Alzheimers Gisborne manager Janet Willson.

“We are a small service doing a huge job in the community for people with dementia.”

Mrs Willson said they had a couple of ideas of what to do with the money and they were both people-focused.

“We want to get up the East Coast.

“There is no specific dementia support for people up there.”

The other idea was to create a group for people aged 65 and under who were coping with early-onset dementia.

“They have different challenges. They or their partners might still be in work, or they might still have children at home.”

Mrs Willson said they were often limited to what they could offer by their resources. Anything new that was introduced, whether it be a new service or staff member, had to be sustainable and funded in the long term.

They had District Health Board funding for the Sherwood Club but other than that, they were entirely reliant on community support.

Each year Ryman Healthcare chooses a charity. Villages around the country all fundraise and at the end of the year whatever is raised is matched by Ryman. Fundraising is already under way this year for the Stroke Foundation, the charity of choice for 2018.

Jams and pickles are available for sale at the shop in Kiri Te Kanawa Village on Gwyneth Place.

Pickles, preserves and jams sold at Ryman Healthcare’s retirement village have many hands contributing to their success.

Call it a team effort in a jar.

Hand-made by Frances Bayley, a resident at Kiri Te Kanawa retirement village, all ingredients are donated, people pitch in for power, then there are the people who buy them.

Sales of the preserves, combined with raffles and other fundraisers, mean village residents were able to donate $11,700 to the Gisborne Alzheimers Society.

Alzheimers New Zealand was Ryman’s chosen charity for 2017 and every cent raised around their retirement villages in New Zealand was matched dollar-for-dollar by Ryman’s head office.

It amounted to $390,000 for Alzheimers NZ, of which $11,700 went directly to the Gisborne branch.

It was absolutely “mind-blowing” to get a big amount like that in one hit, said Alzheimers Gisborne manager Janet Willson.

“We are a small service doing a huge job in the community for people with dementia.”

Mrs Willson said they had a couple of ideas of what to do with the money and they were both people-focused.

“We want to get up the East Coast.

“There is no specific dementia support for people up there.”

The other idea was to create a group for people aged 65 and under who were coping with early-onset dementia.

“They have different challenges. They or their partners might still be in work, or they might still have children at home.”

Mrs Willson said they were often limited to what they could offer by their resources. Anything new that was introduced, whether it be a new service or staff member, had to be sustainable and funded in the long term.

They had District Health Board funding for the Sherwood Club but other than that, they were entirely reliant on community support.

Each year Ryman Healthcare chooses a charity. Villages around the country all fundraise and at the end of the year whatever is raised is matched by Ryman. Fundraising is already under way this year for the Stroke Foundation, the charity of choice for 2018.

Jams and pickles are available for sale at the shop in Kiri Te Kanawa Village on Gwyneth Place.

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