Concrete’s replacement explained in more detail

The reason why six-month old concrete was replaced at the front of Gisborne District Council’s new administration buildings has now become more clear.

Readers contacted The Gisborne Herald after contractors were seen pulling up some of the concrete outside the six-month-old building on a Friday night in July.

A query to the building’s owner, Gisborne Holdings, produced a short reply from general manager of commercial property and projects Rob Budd.

“The entranceway concrete did not meet the required specifications and therefore was replaced at the contractor’s cost.

“To ensure there was no disruption to GDC and the public, the contractor agreed to complete the work during the weekend, hence the late finish on Friday.”

In the weeks following publication of a photograph of the work occurring, The Herald had more calls to tell us the problem with the concrete was with the compass image on the entranceway.

We went back to Gisborne Holdings.

“Yes, the compass was slightly lopsided and did not meet specifications,” Mr Budd said.

“This created a trip hazard, damage to the concrete along the compass edges and, overall, it was not acceptable.”

Mr Budd said it was fixed at the main contractor Watts and Hughes’ cost.

The compass would be reinstated by sandblasting all of the concrete, leaving the compass unblasted with a brush finish.

That work should be completed by the end of August, he said.

The reason why six-month old concrete was replaced at the front of Gisborne District Council’s new administration buildings has now become more clear.

Readers contacted The Gisborne Herald after contractors were seen pulling up some of the concrete outside the six-month-old building on a Friday night in July.

A query to the building’s owner, Gisborne Holdings, produced a short reply from general manager of commercial property and projects Rob Budd.

“The entranceway concrete did not meet the required specifications and therefore was replaced at the contractor’s cost.

“To ensure there was no disruption to GDC and the public, the contractor agreed to complete the work during the weekend, hence the late finish on Friday.”

In the weeks following publication of a photograph of the work occurring, The Herald had more calls to tell us the problem with the concrete was with the compass image on the entranceway.

We went back to Gisborne Holdings.

“Yes, the compass was slightly lopsided and did not meet specifications,” Mr Budd said.

“This created a trip hazard, damage to the concrete along the compass edges and, overall, it was not acceptable.”

Mr Budd said it was fixed at the main contractor Watts and Hughes’ cost.

The compass would be reinstated by sandblasting all of the concrete, leaving the compass unblasted with a brush finish.

That work should be completed by the end of August, he said.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you support the call for a feasibility study into developing an "inland port" and sending the district's export logs to Napier Port by rail, to get log trucks out of the city and to repurpose the port and harbour area?