Gisborne will be central to ‘tier one’ significant event

Together chairing the national co-ordinating committee for Tuia Encounters 250, Dame Jenny Shipley and Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr made their first visit to Gisborne earlier this year as part of ongoing event planning. Picture by Paul Rickard

Gisborne will be at the heart of the Tuia Encounters 250 celebrations next year, co-chairwoman of the co-ordinating committee Dame Jenny Shipley told Gisborne District Council yesterday.

Dame Jenny was joined by her co-chairman Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr, who said Gisborne would set the whole thing in motion.

Both former and present governments had decided this should be a tier one event, one that was so significant it was “part of who we are,” said Dame Jenny.

Tuia would look at the country’s dual heritage. New Zealand was a young country and people should be excited by this, not afraid.

This was not about Cook alone — that was done very well here 50 years ago.

“If you ask us as New Zealanders who we are today, we have come a long way in 50 years and still have a long way to go.”

The focal point of this moment in history was to share that concept of dual heritage in a much deeper and interesting way, to think about the encounters that occurred 250 years ago and speak about them honestly.

“Gisborne sits at the heart of this commemoration,” she said.

“You are the beginning of New Zealand’s story together. There are so many firsts that you sit on.”

New Zealanders should think of taking their children here before they went to Waitangi, because “you own the beginning of the story”.

Dual heritage would encompass both the good and bad. There were very sad things that happened, even in this city.

“You sit on some very precious stories.

The Ngati Oneone story and what occurred on that day was a very important part of the history of New Zealand, she said.

The council was getting very close to allowing both these stories to be told.

Every New Zealander in this room left from somewhere and arrived, whether it was in a waka, the Endeavour or a Boeing last week. People chose to come here from somewhere. That was a very unique attribute of a young nation.

“So we have chosen to use the voyaging analogy that will span that whole experience. There are only a few moments in history that feel like they are filled with potential and this is one of them.

“We should not be afraid of our history.”

If people were honest and prepared to share their history it was the basis of being able to move forward.

Gisborne and the Coast had a most remarkable history. Things like the death of Te Maro were tragedies but they were our story and our history.

“You have an even more unique opportunity as Gisborne people because you were one of the first destinations where the great canoes landed, almost in exactly the same spot as Cook sought to land.

She believed it was a huge economic opportunity and a story that was underdeveloped.

Houroa Barclay-Kerr said he had a feeling that in 250 years people would look back and say this was where a new New Zealand, a new Aotearoa started.

The event opened the door for people to talk about a whole lot of things.

“We are looking at this not only as an event for everyone to come to, but a chance for us to talk about and share our stories collectively and look on to see how could these stories become a part of the growing future everybody talks about.”

Gisborne will be at the heart of the Tuia Encounters 250 celebrations next year, co-chairwoman of the co-ordinating committee Dame Jenny Shipley told Gisborne District Council yesterday.

Dame Jenny was joined by her co-chairman Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr, who said Gisborne would set the whole thing in motion.

Both former and present governments had decided this should be a tier one event, one that was so significant it was “part of who we are,” said Dame Jenny.

Tuia would look at the country’s dual heritage. New Zealand was a young country and people should be excited by this, not afraid.

This was not about Cook alone — that was done very well here 50 years ago.

“If you ask us as New Zealanders who we are today, we have come a long way in 50 years and still have a long way to go.”

The focal point of this moment in history was to share that concept of dual heritage in a much deeper and interesting way, to think about the encounters that occurred 250 years ago and speak about them honestly.

“Gisborne sits at the heart of this commemoration,” she said.

“You are the beginning of New Zealand’s story together. There are so many firsts that you sit on.”

New Zealanders should think of taking their children here before they went to Waitangi, because “you own the beginning of the story”.

Dual heritage would encompass both the good and bad. There were very sad things that happened, even in this city.

“You sit on some very precious stories.

The Ngati Oneone story and what occurred on that day was a very important part of the history of New Zealand, she said.

The council was getting very close to allowing both these stories to be told.

Every New Zealander in this room left from somewhere and arrived, whether it was in a waka, the Endeavour or a Boeing last week. People chose to come here from somewhere. That was a very unique attribute of a young nation.

“So we have chosen to use the voyaging analogy that will span that whole experience. There are only a few moments in history that feel like they are filled with potential and this is one of them.

“We should not be afraid of our history.”

If people were honest and prepared to share their history it was the basis of being able to move forward.

Gisborne and the Coast had a most remarkable history. Things like the death of Te Maro were tragedies but they were our story and our history.

“You have an even more unique opportunity as Gisborne people because you were one of the first destinations where the great canoes landed, almost in exactly the same spot as Cook sought to land.

She believed it was a huge economic opportunity and a story that was underdeveloped.

Houroa Barclay-Kerr said he had a feeling that in 250 years people would look back and say this was where a new New Zealand, a new Aotearoa started.

The event opened the door for people to talk about a whole lot of things.

“We are looking at this not only as an event for everyone to come to, but a chance for us to talk about and share our stories collectively and look on to see how could these stories become a part of the growing future everybody talks about.”

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