Young scientists let loose

SOLAR SAFETY: Nine-year-old Liam Spence of Makaraka School wants to keep our roads safe and found his solar-lit signs worked a treat. His is just one of the exhibits at the Eastland Network Science and Technology Fair. Pictures by Rebecca Grunwell
GRASS, GRASS, GRASS: Eight-year-old Bella Swann and nine-year-old Kaycee Andrew from Makaraka School experimented by making bio-grass and found compost worked best.
CLOUDY SCIENCE: Six-year-old Kaleb Jane from Mata School on the East Coast enjoys learning about the water cycle of clouds, although he likes it most when the sun shines.

Six new schools have joined the Eastland Network Science and Technology Fair this year.

Fair co-ordinator Mihi Hannah is pleased with the entries from more than 20 schools.

The kids are responding to the problems they see in their community, she says.

“They are more critical of their own environment.

A number of projects are aimed at solving the slash problem in Tolaga Bay or the issue of rubbish on beaches.

The competition has been getting stronger every year as it becomes ‘‘cooler’’ to be a part of it, she says.

“It has also been great having The Mind Lab by Unitec involved, as they open up their space and resources to the schools.

“This has allowed for a more authentic creation of science projects.”

Ms Hannah said there was an increase in the number of projects completed in Te Reo Maori.

There was a large variety of projects, including creating hydro-power, environment-friendly skateboards and drones made by recycling.

Kids also investigated the properties of honey and coffee grinds, challenged the five-second rule and asked whether wifi affects plant growth.

With more than $2000 in prizes up for grabs, and trophies and certificates to be won, the fair provides high levels of motivation for both schools and students.

  • The fair opened last night and is open to the public from Saturday to Monday from 9am to 3pm at the Showgrounds Event Centre.
  • Entry is free.
  • Prize-giving will be at 5.30pm on August 28 at Gisborne Boys’ High School.

Six new schools have joined the Eastland Network Science and Technology Fair this year.

Fair co-ordinator Mihi Hannah is pleased with the entries from more than 20 schools.

The kids are responding to the problems they see in their community, she says.

“They are more critical of their own environment.

A number of projects are aimed at solving the slash problem in Tolaga Bay or the issue of rubbish on beaches.

The competition has been getting stronger every year as it becomes ‘‘cooler’’ to be a part of it, she says.

“It has also been great having The Mind Lab by Unitec involved, as they open up their space and resources to the schools.

“This has allowed for a more authentic creation of science projects.”

Ms Hannah said there was an increase in the number of projects completed in Te Reo Maori.

There was a large variety of projects, including creating hydro-power, environment-friendly skateboards and drones made by recycling.

Kids also investigated the properties of honey and coffee grinds, challenged the five-second rule and asked whether wifi affects plant growth.

With more than $2000 in prizes up for grabs, and trophies and certificates to be won, the fair provides high levels of motivation for both schools and students.

  • The fair opened last night and is open to the public from Saturday to Monday from 9am to 3pm at the Showgrounds Event Centre.
  • Entry is free.
  • Prize-giving will be at 5.30pm on August 28 at Gisborne Boys’ High School.
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