Anti-1080 message is loud and clear

A loud group of anti-1080 protestors marched through the streets of Gisborne before congregating at Heipipi Endeavour Park yesterday. The action called for a nationwide ban on the pest control substance. Picture by Liam Clayton

More than 30 protesters calling for the nationwide ban of 1080 took to Gisborne streets yesterday.

They held signs saying “Ban 1080”, “Stop poisoning our water” and “Stop the drops”, and called out to passing motorists for support.

Protest co-organiser Gabrielle Tamihana was pleased with the turnout, which she said was indicative of the level of opposition against the use of 1080.

“We are part of a national opposition movement called Operation Ban 1080.

“Not a lot of people are aware of what 1080 is and what it actually does. It kills everything. It’s supposed to be for pest control but at the moment it’s killing everything.

“This kind of event is about raising awareness and getting people to look it up, and become better informed.”

Gisborne District Council environmental services and protection director Nick Zaman said the council had not used 1080 since 2001.

“With increased concerns about the risks of continued use of 1080, the council looked at other available control options for possum control. We would only consider using it if it was absolutely necessary and under specific conditions, such as in the event of an outbreak of animals being infected with TB.”

Forest and Bird chairman Grant Vincent said it was important people were not influenced by pseudo-science and misinformation.

“Forest and Bird supports the use of aerial 1080 for large-scale operations because it is so good at killing possums, stoats and rats — major destroyers of our native flora and fauna.

“Ground-based bait stations and traps have their place but are impractical for large rugged areas, where high pest numbers are causing extensive destruction.

“The only aerial 1080 operation in Tairawhiti was years ago and the world didn’t implode, and any benefits for indigenous ecosystems from that pest control will have dissipated long ago.”

The council used 1080 in bait stations from 1990 to 2000, and in two aerial drops; in 2000 and 2001.

Before 2000, a paste form of 1080 was used for ground-based operations. It was applied in bait stations or suitable tree baiting sites.

Both aerial and ground-based applications of 1080 require adherence to strict criteria and can only proceed with final approval from the Medical Officer of Health.

Operation Ban 1080 has more than 35,000 members on Facebook and Ms Tamihana said they were “not just Greenies”.

“This isn’t about some kind of conspiracy theory. It’s about safety and the health of our lands, wildlife and people.”

The group is planning a hikoi to Wellington on September 8.

More than 30 protesters calling for the nationwide ban of 1080 took to Gisborne streets yesterday.

They held signs saying “Ban 1080”, “Stop poisoning our water” and “Stop the drops”, and called out to passing motorists for support.

Protest co-organiser Gabrielle Tamihana was pleased with the turnout, which she said was indicative of the level of opposition against the use of 1080.

“We are part of a national opposition movement called Operation Ban 1080.

“Not a lot of people are aware of what 1080 is and what it actually does. It kills everything. It’s supposed to be for pest control but at the moment it’s killing everything.

“This kind of event is about raising awareness and getting people to look it up, and become better informed.”

Gisborne District Council environmental services and protection director Nick Zaman said the council had not used 1080 since 2001.

“With increased concerns about the risks of continued use of 1080, the council looked at other available control options for possum control. We would only consider using it if it was absolutely necessary and under specific conditions, such as in the event of an outbreak of animals being infected with TB.”

Forest and Bird chairman Grant Vincent said it was important people were not influenced by pseudo-science and misinformation.

“Forest and Bird supports the use of aerial 1080 for large-scale operations because it is so good at killing possums, stoats and rats — major destroyers of our native flora and fauna.

“Ground-based bait stations and traps have their place but are impractical for large rugged areas, where high pest numbers are causing extensive destruction.

“The only aerial 1080 operation in Tairawhiti was years ago and the world didn’t implode, and any benefits for indigenous ecosystems from that pest control will have dissipated long ago.”

The council used 1080 in bait stations from 1990 to 2000, and in two aerial drops; in 2000 and 2001.

Before 2000, a paste form of 1080 was used for ground-based operations. It was applied in bait stations or suitable tree baiting sites.

Both aerial and ground-based applications of 1080 require adherence to strict criteria and can only proceed with final approval from the Medical Officer of Health.

Operation Ban 1080 has more than 35,000 members on Facebook and Ms Tamihana said they were “not just Greenies”.

“This isn’t about some kind of conspiracy theory. It’s about safety and the health of our lands, wildlife and people.”

The group is planning a hikoi to Wellington on September 8.

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Peter Jones - 29 days ago
The Gisborne region has been spared from 1080 so far because the powers that be fear the voice of the local Maori who would be up in arms if they saw first hand what 1080 actually does.
"1080 can..cause reproductive toxicity in male mammalian species" studies on rats show "Severe decreases in the sperm counts were found. Sperm mobility was reduced to 0%, and[an] increase in abnormal sperm (to 99%) was reported [in rats receiving 0.25mg 1080 per kg bw/day for 90 days]"
"In the [56 day] recovery phase..no improvement in the semen parameters [or testes weights]..was apparent, the evidence suggests that after prolonged exposure to 1080, recovery of the male testes and spermatogenesis is unlikely"
A study on Minks showed "[female mink fed 0.8ppm 1080 per day] showed a significant reduction in body weight..[of two successfully mated]..only one produced kits..these kits did not survive to the 3rd week post-partum"
"The fertility of mink fed a diet containing 0.8 ppm of 1080 was greatly reduced. Toxic effects on the testes..resulting in an absence of sperm was the apparent cause of the reproductive failure"
"[In the 0.2 ppm dose per day group of mink], whelping was reduced to 7/12 (58%)"
I fear that NZ is playing host to an experiment in eugenics by the United Nations to hasten the goals of agenda 2030. Dropped into our water supply or anywhere else 1080 could cause human sterility - and if it does, they are hardly going to tell the public now are they.

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