Music from the state of theta

Neil and Liam Finn.

Music reviewer James Belfield calls Neil and Liam Finn’s new album, Lightsleeper, a work of genius. Another reviewer, Pablo Gorondi, says with its “dreamy atmospheres, multi-section song structures and hazy shades of melody providing the framework, Lightsleeper is closer to the Finn family’s foundational Split Enz era than to the more renowned Crowded House productions.”

What’s not at all surprising is how musically rewarding a listen it is, writes New Zealand Herald entertainment writer Karl Puschmann.

“The tension between Neil’s pop supremacy and the nous of Liam’s lo-fi experimentalist tendencies find a comfy common ground that’s a lot more out there and experimental than you might imagine,”

In an interview on infotainment show The Project, Liam Finn said the album, “kind of inhabited that space of in-between falling asleep and being awake and being asleep — that zone you can be in, that place where you fall off the fence and you jolt yourself awake.

“That’s the place I was hoping to evoke with a lot of sounds we were making.”

Puschmann was taken by the duo’s seven-minute long opus Where’s My Room.

“Kicking off as a languid, loose funk jam, the guitars eventually slip away as the song takes a Beatles-esque turn into classic Neil pop territory, before baroque disco strings hit and the whole thing breaks down into a wildly hallucinogenic, clattering freakout. It’s brilliant.”

This is not the sort of music that has catchy pop hooks that replay themselves of their own accord in your head. On first play you sense repeated plays are required to fathom the album’s various atmospheres. As they reveal themselves the experience gets richer.

Music reviewer James Belfield calls Neil and Liam Finn’s new album, Lightsleeper, a work of genius. Another reviewer, Pablo Gorondi, says with its “dreamy atmospheres, multi-section song structures and hazy shades of melody providing the framework, Lightsleeper is closer to the Finn family’s foundational Split Enz era than to the more renowned Crowded House productions.”

What’s not at all surprising is how musically rewarding a listen it is, writes New Zealand Herald entertainment writer Karl Puschmann.

“The tension between Neil’s pop supremacy and the nous of Liam’s lo-fi experimentalist tendencies find a comfy common ground that’s a lot more out there and experimental than you might imagine,”

In an interview on infotainment show The Project, Liam Finn said the album, “kind of inhabited that space of in-between falling asleep and being awake and being asleep — that zone you can be in, that place where you fall off the fence and you jolt yourself awake.

“That’s the place I was hoping to evoke with a lot of sounds we were making.”

Puschmann was taken by the duo’s seven-minute long opus Where’s My Room.

“Kicking off as a languid, loose funk jam, the guitars eventually slip away as the song takes a Beatles-esque turn into classic Neil pop territory, before baroque disco strings hit and the whole thing breaks down into a wildly hallucinogenic, clattering freakout. It’s brilliant.”

This is not the sort of music that has catchy pop hooks that replay themselves of their own accord in your head. On first play you sense repeated plays are required to fathom the album’s various atmospheres. As they reveal themselves the experience gets richer.

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