Training for the forests

Skills courses funded and ready to start next month.

Skills courses funded and ready to start next month.

Steve Beach
Siobhain Fyall

Two new forestry initiatives to help address a longstanding forestry skills shortage will get under way next month.

The ManaiaSAFE Forestry School and Eastland Wood Council’s Generation Programme have both been given Government funding to get started.

The school was given $301,000 to pilot its logging training programme from the Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) last week.

In April, the Generation Programme was funded $215,000 over three years from the Government’s He Poutama Rangatahi employment scheme, plus an additional $60,000 from the Ministry of Social Development.

Both start on October 15, with the Generation Programme taking a second intake in late April 2019.

Project manager Henry Koia said the innovative feature of the school’s training model is access to a learning environment that is fully health and safety-compliant and fit-for-purpose.

This learning environment supports a Maori kaupapa-based practice and delivery model that places emphasis on learning by doing and skills repetition to develop learner competence and confidence.

School managing director Steve Beach said a 20-week pilot training programme will be run on the East Coast to test the feasibility of the most complex aspect of the school’s training model — using the school’s harvesting sites to deliver practical harvesting training.

As well as the PGF, the school has had funding approved from Eastland Community Trust and the Forest Growers Levy Trust.

“Trainees will receive travel assistance and pastoral care that supports their wellbeing while they learn. The idea is to place those who graduate into fulltime employment in an industry that is an economic driver for the region but is crying out for more skilled workers to keep pace with rising harvesting volumes,” he said.

Pilot graduates will hold the New Zealand Certificate in Forest Harvesting Operations at level 3, with strands in either tree-felling and quality control, breaking out cable, or manual processing and quality control.

In the pilot, 11 students will be enrolled with Eastern Institute of Technology, which will sub-contract the school to deliver the pilot training programme.

There is strong support for the pilot from local logging contractors and forestry service provider businesses, with five job offers from five logging companies already on the table for the school’s graduates.

Independent researcher Margaret Wilkie has been appointed to lead the research and evaluation component of the school’s pilot project.

Her brief is to deliver a high-quality research report that is underpinned by academic rigour by the end of March 2019.

Training pathway with real-world introduction

Eastland Wood Council chief executive Kim Holland says ultimately the pilot logging school will become a training pathway within the new Eastland Wood Council-driven Generation Programme, which aims to ensure that new trainees are given a real-world introduction to the different sectors within the industry.

Siobhain Fyall has been appointed manager of EWC’s Generation Programme.

Participants will spend six weeks at a forestry base camp industry introduction programme, followed by ‘learn while you earn’ employment with contractors, complemented with part-time courses and a continuing individualised training plan through EIT Tairawhiti, Turanga Ararau and Competenz.

Students will receive pastoral care from First Choice Employment and Mrs Fyall.

The new programme is set to produce 12 graduates in the first year, 30 in the second and 60 in the third.

Ms Holland said base camp trainees would work towards a New Zealand Certificate in Foundation Forestry Skills Level 2, which would pathway into level three and four qualifications, with on-the-job training pathways across forestry and harvesting options.

Early on, trainees will get an introduction to careers by visiting different sectors and talking to people working in forestry.

The Generation Programme would provide a direct pipeline of work-ready, skilled and trained people into employment in the forest industry, she said.

Brings experience to training school

ManaiaSAFE Forestry School Managing Director Steve Beach brings invaluable insight to the school’s governance table.

Holding a Diploma in Forest Management, he has 19 years of industry experience under his belt.

His job roles with log harvesting companies over his forestry career have included health and safety management, human resources management, and production management.

He is also a ‘Growing our Safety Culture’ facilitator with the Forest Industry Safety Council, and a Competenz assessor.

Immediately attracted to her new role

Newly-appointed Generation Programme manager Siobhain Fyall for years listened to her husband, a forestry veteran of 25 years, talk about the issues the forestry industry has faced.

Now she has the chance to help make a difference.

“I hear a lot about the issues they face trying to find workers,” says Mrs Fyall.

“It comes down to having basic common sense, a good attitude and an understanding of what it is to have a decent work ethic.

“Finding workers with these basic skills seems to be increasingly hard.”

She has 25 years tertiary teaching experience, predominantly with youth, and focused on employment skills and work-based training.

She lived in Balclutha, South Otago, for 12 years before moving with her family to Gisborne, where she worked with Tairawhiti Polytechnic, now EIT.

Over the past few years, Mrs Fyall toyed with the idea of establishing her own agency that would match forestry workers with employers.

“I never got around to it, so when I saw this job advertised, I knew I would have to apply,” she says.

“I am excited to be part of this new innovative approach to forestry training.

“It offers a contextualised learning and training environment that will allow our trainees an opportunity to experience working in a real work environment.

“Trainees will get a mapped career pathway, which will offer choices across different strands of interest in the industry.

“We aim to match the trainee with a suitable employer for their placement,” says Mrs Fyall.

“The initial six weeks will build their self-esteem and confidence by providing robust pastoral care, and identify any issues or barriers that might impede their training.”

Two new forestry initiatives to help address a longstanding forestry skills shortage will get under way next month.

The ManaiaSAFE Forestry School and Eastland Wood Council’s Generation Programme have both been given Government funding to get started.

The school was given $301,000 to pilot its logging training programme from the Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) last week.

In April, the Generation Programme was funded $215,000 over three years from the Government’s He Poutama Rangatahi employment scheme, plus an additional $60,000 from the Ministry of Social Development.

Both start on October 15, with the Generation Programme taking a second intake in late April 2019.

Project manager Henry Koia said the innovative feature of the school’s training model is access to a learning environment that is fully health and safety-compliant and fit-for-purpose.

This learning environment supports a Maori kaupapa-based practice and delivery model that places emphasis on learning by doing and skills repetition to develop learner competence and confidence.

School managing director Steve Beach said a 20-week pilot training programme will be run on the East Coast to test the feasibility of the most complex aspect of the school’s training model — using the school’s harvesting sites to deliver practical harvesting training.

As well as the PGF, the school has had funding approved from Eastland Community Trust and the Forest Growers Levy Trust.

“Trainees will receive travel assistance and pastoral care that supports their wellbeing while they learn. The idea is to place those who graduate into fulltime employment in an industry that is an economic driver for the region but is crying out for more skilled workers to keep pace with rising harvesting volumes,” he said.

Pilot graduates will hold the New Zealand Certificate in Forest Harvesting Operations at level 3, with strands in either tree-felling and quality control, breaking out cable, or manual processing and quality control.

In the pilot, 11 students will be enrolled with Eastern Institute of Technology, which will sub-contract the school to deliver the pilot training programme.

There is strong support for the pilot from local logging contractors and forestry service provider businesses, with five job offers from five logging companies already on the table for the school’s graduates.

Independent researcher Margaret Wilkie has been appointed to lead the research and evaluation component of the school’s pilot project.

Her brief is to deliver a high-quality research report that is underpinned by academic rigour by the end of March 2019.

Training pathway with real-world introduction

Eastland Wood Council chief executive Kim Holland says ultimately the pilot logging school will become a training pathway within the new Eastland Wood Council-driven Generation Programme, which aims to ensure that new trainees are given a real-world introduction to the different sectors within the industry.

Siobhain Fyall has been appointed manager of EWC’s Generation Programme.

Participants will spend six weeks at a forestry base camp industry introduction programme, followed by ‘learn while you earn’ employment with contractors, complemented with part-time courses and a continuing individualised training plan through EIT Tairawhiti, Turanga Ararau and Competenz.

Students will receive pastoral care from First Choice Employment and Mrs Fyall.

The new programme is set to produce 12 graduates in the first year, 30 in the second and 60 in the third.

Ms Holland said base camp trainees would work towards a New Zealand Certificate in Foundation Forestry Skills Level 2, which would pathway into level three and four qualifications, with on-the-job training pathways across forestry and harvesting options.

Early on, trainees will get an introduction to careers by visiting different sectors and talking to people working in forestry.

The Generation Programme would provide a direct pipeline of work-ready, skilled and trained people into employment in the forest industry, she said.

Brings experience to training school

ManaiaSAFE Forestry School Managing Director Steve Beach brings invaluable insight to the school’s governance table.

Holding a Diploma in Forest Management, he has 19 years of industry experience under his belt.

His job roles with log harvesting companies over his forestry career have included health and safety management, human resources management, and production management.

He is also a ‘Growing our Safety Culture’ facilitator with the Forest Industry Safety Council, and a Competenz assessor.

Immediately attracted to her new role

Newly-appointed Generation Programme manager Siobhain Fyall for years listened to her husband, a forestry veteran of 25 years, talk about the issues the forestry industry has faced.

Now she has the chance to help make a difference.

“I hear a lot about the issues they face trying to find workers,” says Mrs Fyall.

“It comes down to having basic common sense, a good attitude and an understanding of what it is to have a decent work ethic.

“Finding workers with these basic skills seems to be increasingly hard.”

She has 25 years tertiary teaching experience, predominantly with youth, and focused on employment skills and work-based training.

She lived in Balclutha, South Otago, for 12 years before moving with her family to Gisborne, where she worked with Tairawhiti Polytechnic, now EIT.

Over the past few years, Mrs Fyall toyed with the idea of establishing her own agency that would match forestry workers with employers.

“I never got around to it, so when I saw this job advertised, I knew I would have to apply,” she says.

“I am excited to be part of this new innovative approach to forestry training.

“It offers a contextualised learning and training environment that will allow our trainees an opportunity to experience working in a real work environment.

“Trainees will get a mapped career pathway, which will offer choices across different strands of interest in the industry.

“We aim to match the trainee with a suitable employer for their placement,” says Mrs Fyall.

“The initial six weeks will build their self-esteem and confidence by providing robust pastoral care, and identify any issues or barriers that might impede their training.”

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Robert Taitimu, Whakatane - 1 month ago
I wish all the best for what is a challenging but rewarding pathway, "Kia kaha koutou katoa"

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