Chance to test-drive an electric vehicle on Saturday

Five EVs, escooters and ebikes will be available between 10am and noon at the Marina Carpark

Five EVs, escooters and ebikes will be available between 10am and noon at the Marina Carpark

Electric Village test drive event

Gisborne’s Electric Village will host a community electric vehicle (EV) test drive event in the Marina Carpark on Saturday to celebrate International Drive Electric Week.

Electric Village is New Zealand’s first ‘new energy’ hub, located in the yellow building at 37 Gladstone Road.

It is dedicated to providing information about all things electric, including solar, electric vehicles and ebikes, says energy champion Katherine Evett.

“The Blair family have just purchased an EV after visiting our space and taking an EV for a test drive, and they are loving it,” she says.

Carolyn Blair and her family have bought a Nissan Leaf. It has been a positive change to her lifestyle, she says.

“I love it. It’s really changed the way that we function.

“There’s a real feel-good factor to running an EV. I find it very smooth to drive and the lack of noise is really pleasant.”

The family did a lot of research before they changed to an EV. They chose a sports model that has a few additional features.

“It’s got things like heated seats and a heated steering wheel, which are a real luxury on a cold morning. But the biggest luxury of all is never having to spend time filling up at a petrol station.”

Not filling up at a petrol station is not just saving time — it is saving her money as well.

She says while the environment played a role in her decision, it was the economic benefits of owning an EV that sealed the deal.

“The more I looked into it, the more it seemed a bit of a no-brainer.

“Electric Village were really helpful and answered lots of my questions, as well as letting me test-drive one of their EVs for a few days.

“I had friends and family as well who recommended making the change.”

There is a perception that electric vehicles are really expensive but they paid $24,000 for it, which she says was a lot less than they would have done if they had bought a petrol SUV.

“I really think this is a very affordable option for the family.

“It’s an ongoing saving as well. Not only our running costs, but also our servicing costs. We’re expecting with fewer moving parts that it will be much more economical to look after our Leaf.”

Ms Evett says there will be five EVs to test at the event this weekend, as well as escooters and ebikes, and the Electric Village team will be on hand to answer any questions and share some helpful facts and figures.

It will be from 10am until midday at the Marina carpark.

Gisborne’s Electric Village will host a community electric vehicle (EV) test drive event in the Marina Carpark on Saturday to celebrate International Drive Electric Week.

Electric Village is New Zealand’s first ‘new energy’ hub, located in the yellow building at 37 Gladstone Road.

It is dedicated to providing information about all things electric, including solar, electric vehicles and ebikes, says energy champion Katherine Evett.

“The Blair family have just purchased an EV after visiting our space and taking an EV for a test drive, and they are loving it,” she says.

Carolyn Blair and her family have bought a Nissan Leaf. It has been a positive change to her lifestyle, she says.

“I love it. It’s really changed the way that we function.

“There’s a real feel-good factor to running an EV. I find it very smooth to drive and the lack of noise is really pleasant.”

The family did a lot of research before they changed to an EV. They chose a sports model that has a few additional features.

“It’s got things like heated seats and a heated steering wheel, which are a real luxury on a cold morning. But the biggest luxury of all is never having to spend time filling up at a petrol station.”

Not filling up at a petrol station is not just saving time — it is saving her money as well.

She says while the environment played a role in her decision, it was the economic benefits of owning an EV that sealed the deal.

“The more I looked into it, the more it seemed a bit of a no-brainer.

“Electric Village were really helpful and answered lots of my questions, as well as letting me test-drive one of their EVs for a few days.

“I had friends and family as well who recommended making the change.”

There is a perception that electric vehicles are really expensive but they paid $24,000 for it, which she says was a lot less than they would have done if they had bought a petrol SUV.

“I really think this is a very affordable option for the family.

“It’s an ongoing saving as well. Not only our running costs, but also our servicing costs. We’re expecting with fewer moving parts that it will be much more economical to look after our Leaf.”

Ms Evett says there will be five EVs to test at the event this weekend, as well as escooters and ebikes, and the Electric Village team will be on hand to answer any questions and share some helpful facts and figures.

It will be from 10am until midday at the Marina carpark.

Proud to support te reo

Energy hub Electric Village is embracing Te Wiki o Te Reo Maori, with new Maori signage.

For this week, the village will be known as ‘Papakainga Whai Hiko’, and has a large street sign on display outside its Gladstone Road office.

As the home of “new energy” in Tairawhiti, the village also has a large welcome sign on the store window to recognise this identity, which says ‘Nau mai! Haere mai, ki te kokoru o te ngao taiao o te Tairawhiti’. It means ‘Welcome to the energy hub of Tairawhiti’.

Energy champion Katherine Evett said community was a key factor in Electric Village, or Papakainga Whai Hiko, supporting Te Wiki o Te Reo Maori.

“The community can come here and visit, for inspiration, to learn more about energy technology, solar power and electric bikes.

“As a community space, and with our population in this region being 50 percent Maori, it seemed like a great kaupapa (cause) to support.

“We’re really proud to support and be part of Te Wiki o Te Reo Maori.

“We have five fluent te reo-speaking staff based here at the village and in our Eastland Group network. They helped to put the words together for our signs. They called in the experts and worked with their wider whanau so that we could get an appropriate translation, because there isn’t a direct translation for words like energy technology and electric village.”

The Papakainga Whai Hiko signage is up for this week but Katherine says it could stay up for another week.

“We’re really proud to have it up, and we’d like to come up with some more innovative ways to celebrate and support te reo Maori.”

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