Appropriate week to launch in-kura first aid

A curriculum supported by ACC, ASB bank and St John was launched this Maori Language week to encourage kura kaupapa and kohanga reo to take up in-school first aid training.

St John has updated and translated its ASB St John in Schools curriculum, recruiting three new fluent te reo educators ready to travel to Maori-medium education providers around the country.

“We want kura kaupapa and kohanga reo to get in touch and work together to co-design tailored courses for them, said St John director of community health services Sarah Manley.

“This week’s launch is significant, not only for tamariki, but for their whanau, friends and communities who can benefit from their training.”

This year saw the 400,000th child to be educated through St John’s in-school programme.

“So to tick off another extremely important milestone in 2018 gets us that next step closer to equitable health outcomes for the entire country.

“With St John receiving more than 50 emergency 111 calls a week from children, ASB St John in Schools has never been more needed.

“Our training equips kids with skills and confidence to take action and respond in an emergency.”

Ms Manley said the launch of their te reo curriculum was a good opportunity to repeat their call for compulsory first aid training in every school in New Zealand.

“That aligns with the Labour-led Government’s objectives in its “School Leavers’ Toolkit” policy.”

A curriculum supported by ACC, ASB bank and St John was launched this Maori Language week to encourage kura kaupapa and kohanga reo to take up in-school first aid training.

St John has updated and translated its ASB St John in Schools curriculum, recruiting three new fluent te reo educators ready to travel to Maori-medium education providers around the country.

“We want kura kaupapa and kohanga reo to get in touch and work together to co-design tailored courses for them, said St John director of community health services Sarah Manley.

“This week’s launch is significant, not only for tamariki, but for their whanau, friends and communities who can benefit from their training.”

This year saw the 400,000th child to be educated through St John’s in-school programme.

“So to tick off another extremely important milestone in 2018 gets us that next step closer to equitable health outcomes for the entire country.

“With St John receiving more than 50 emergency 111 calls a week from children, ASB St John in Schools has never been more needed.

“Our training equips kids with skills and confidence to take action and respond in an emergency.”

Ms Manley said the launch of their te reo curriculum was a good opportunity to repeat their call for compulsory first aid training in every school in New Zealand.

“That aligns with the Labour-led Government’s objectives in its “School Leavers’ Toolkit” policy.”

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