Striking a chord with her students

ROCKING THE AWARDS: Gisborne Girls' High music teacher Jane Egan is one of three finalists in the New Zealand Music Awards' inaugural Music Teacher of the Year award.

Among the three finalists selected from more than 200 submissions for the New Zealand Music Awards’ inaugural Music Teacher of the Year award is Gisborne Girls’ High teacher Jane Egan.

Each of the three music teachers are recognised for their impact on students and the community.

This year alone, Ms Egan has helped the development of 12 Smokefree Rockquest bands, eight Tangata Beats bands and 15 entries in the Rockquest solo/duo category.

The music room is where magic happens, says the former Gisborne Girls’ High student, now a music teacher and head of department.

“I think music is one of the subjects where you see the greatest connection between student and teacher. We are privileged and trusted with songwriters’ inner-most thoughts.

“We get to work with students when they are at their most vulnerable, pushing them through the performance anxiety barrier.”

Ms Egan aims to give her students authentic learning experiences and opportunities that might not otherwise be readily available, says New Zealand Music Awards organisers.

As Head of Department, she provides students the chance to work with and learn from local musicians, and encourages them to get involved with music at an extracurricular level.

In a story on the awards on TV3 show The Project on Wednesday night, Ms Egan said she did not know who nominated her or how that happened.

“It’s nice to know I’ve made an impact on someone’s life. I had great music teachers and they changed my life because they gave me the passion and I hope I can pass that passion on to my students.”

The other two nominees are Elizabeth Sneyd from Porirua’s Virtuoso Strings Charitable Trust and Chisnallwood Intermediate School teacher Judith Bell.

The New Zealand Music Awards are being held at Spark Arena in Auckland on Thursday, November 15.

Among the three finalists selected from more than 200 submissions for the New Zealand Music Awards’ inaugural Music Teacher of the Year award is Gisborne Girls’ High teacher Jane Egan.

Each of the three music teachers are recognised for their impact on students and the community.

This year alone, Ms Egan has helped the development of 12 Smokefree Rockquest bands, eight Tangata Beats bands and 15 entries in the Rockquest solo/duo category.

The music room is where magic happens, says the former Gisborne Girls’ High student, now a music teacher and head of department.

“I think music is one of the subjects where you see the greatest connection between student and teacher. We are privileged and trusted with songwriters’ inner-most thoughts.

“We get to work with students when they are at their most vulnerable, pushing them through the performance anxiety barrier.”

Ms Egan aims to give her students authentic learning experiences and opportunities that might not otherwise be readily available, says New Zealand Music Awards organisers.

As Head of Department, she provides students the chance to work with and learn from local musicians, and encourages them to get involved with music at an extracurricular level.

In a story on the awards on TV3 show The Project on Wednesday night, Ms Egan said she did not know who nominated her or how that happened.

“It’s nice to know I’ve made an impact on someone’s life. I had great music teachers and they changed my life because they gave me the passion and I hope I can pass that passion on to my students.”

The other two nominees are Elizabeth Sneyd from Porirua’s Virtuoso Strings Charitable Trust and Chisnallwood Intermediate School teacher Judith Bell.

The New Zealand Music Awards are being held at Spark Arena in Auckland on Thursday, November 15.

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