Get rid of bridge walls say half of poll respondents

OVER half of the responses to this week’s webpoll question were in favour of replacing the Gladstone Road bridge’s concrete parapets with steel railings.

The question was simplified from its original post to read: “Do you think Gladstone Road Bridge should have its concrete parapet walls converted to steel railings on one, or both of its sides as part of the upgrade and widening under way?”

Many of the 58 percent (272 out of 468 responses) in favour of steel railings on both sides of the bridge cited river and harbour views and reduced weight on the bridge as reasons for their decision.

“Now is a chance to give Gisborne’s picturesque setting a major makeover,” said one respondent.

“Get that huge tonnage off the bridge, extend its life and avoid the need for a cantilevered pedestrian/cycle clip-on to carry the weight of several trucks.”

Lightening the bridge through removal of both concrete wall would mean it will last longer like Peel Street Bridge, said another respondent.

“Everyone will be able to see the river activities, especially wheelchair users and children. It’s probably the last chance to update this bridge. Just do it now.”

Others in the favour of switching to steel railings spurned the argument the ferrocrete walls had historic value.

“Being ‘historic’ has little significance when they just look like large hideous hunks of concrete,” said one person.

Others were more acerbic.

“I can see the day when somebody will want to pull down The Warehouse and we will be told it is an icon of a classical build of the turn of the century and should be treated as a taonga for all eternity.”

Among 27 percent (272 people) who said no to the suggestion of replacing the concrete walls with steel railings was the respondent who questioned the claim the concrete side restrict the views.

“I can see over them to the river below. The photos in the newspaper show the contractors looking over them and seeing the view.”

The same respondent saw historic value in the concrete walls.

“The sides should be kept the same to retain the historical value of the bridge. Yes, the bridge will have been altered by the project, but rebuilt in the style consistent with the original design. We do this with so many historical structures.”

Another respondent in the “no” camp had an idea to enhance the historical character of the concrete walls.

“The only reason for the concrete walls to remain would be if they were to reinstate the Victorian lights. If that is not possible, then open up the bridge and let the rivers shine through.”

“Steel railings on the harbour-view side only” got a tick of approval from 10 percent (47) of respondents.

“The harbour view is a better view, compared to the ugly, rubbish-laden marina,” said one person who added cleaning up the rivers should be a priority. “Not bloody bridge views.”

Indecision over making the most of opportunities is typical of Gisborne, said a respondent in favour of steel railings on the harbour-view side only.

“Not only does it free up the view, it lightens the heavy load on the bridge so it lasts for years to come. Come on GDC. Now’s the time to step up and prove you’re in control.”

Five percent (24) of respondents were undecided.

“Too bloody late now to ask these stupid questions,” said one.

“Might as well wait till the works are completed then ask for a poll on bridge replacement.”

OVER half of the responses to this week’s webpoll question were in favour of replacing the Gladstone Road bridge’s concrete parapets with steel railings.

The question was simplified from its original post to read: “Do you think Gladstone Road Bridge should have its concrete parapet walls converted to steel railings on one, or both of its sides as part of the upgrade and widening under way?”

Many of the 58 percent (272 out of 468 responses) in favour of steel railings on both sides of the bridge cited river and harbour views and reduced weight on the bridge as reasons for their decision.

“Now is a chance to give Gisborne’s picturesque setting a major makeover,” said one respondent.

“Get that huge tonnage off the bridge, extend its life and avoid the need for a cantilevered pedestrian/cycle clip-on to carry the weight of several trucks.”

Lightening the bridge through removal of both concrete wall would mean it will last longer like Peel Street Bridge, said another respondent.

“Everyone will be able to see the river activities, especially wheelchair users and children. It’s probably the last chance to update this bridge. Just do it now.”

Others in the favour of switching to steel railings spurned the argument the ferrocrete walls had historic value.

“Being ‘historic’ has little significance when they just look like large hideous hunks of concrete,” said one person.

Others were more acerbic.

“I can see the day when somebody will want to pull down The Warehouse and we will be told it is an icon of a classical build of the turn of the century and should be treated as a taonga for all eternity.”

Among 27 percent (272 people) who said no to the suggestion of replacing the concrete walls with steel railings was the respondent who questioned the claim the concrete side restrict the views.

“I can see over them to the river below. The photos in the newspaper show the contractors looking over them and seeing the view.”

The same respondent saw historic value in the concrete walls.

“The sides should be kept the same to retain the historical value of the bridge. Yes, the bridge will have been altered by the project, but rebuilt in the style consistent with the original design. We do this with so many historical structures.”

Another respondent in the “no” camp had an idea to enhance the historical character of the concrete walls.

“The only reason for the concrete walls to remain would be if they were to reinstate the Victorian lights. If that is not possible, then open up the bridge and let the rivers shine through.”

“Steel railings on the harbour-view side only” got a tick of approval from 10 percent (47) of respondents.

“The harbour view is a better view, compared to the ugly, rubbish-laden marina,” said one person who added cleaning up the rivers should be a priority. “Not bloody bridge views.”

Indecision over making the most of opportunities is typical of Gisborne, said a respondent in favour of steel railings on the harbour-view side only.

“Not only does it free up the view, it lightens the heavy load on the bridge so it lasts for years to come. Come on GDC. Now’s the time to step up and prove you’re in control.”

Five percent (24) of respondents were undecided.

“Too bloody late now to ask these stupid questions,” said one.

“Might as well wait till the works are completed then ask for a poll on bridge replacement.”

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Ian - 2 months ago
Wider pathway without the thickness of the concrete walls making for safer passing

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