Had a plan, executed it well – again

The judges love ’em. NZ Stuff hates ’em. But whatever the outcome of the The Block NZ 2018, we won’t forget ’em.

Gizzy Hard’s Amy Moore and Stu Watts once again did what they keep doing on the renovation reality TV series — impressing the judges at the weekly Room Reveal, this time the laundry and a “redo” of another area of their Hobsonville Point townhouse.

Whether that is good enough to add another victory to their collection will be answered tonight.

Last night’s episode, as predictably as a Stuff reviewer bagging Yellow’s Amy and Stu, left the TV audience up in the air.

The two minus-1 game-changing points Team Orange’s Claire and Agni have collected in recent weeks were jettisoned into play, both against Yellow after their laundry was scored close to perfect.

“A lovely space, very relaxing, very calm,” said judge Jason Bonham, which is exactly what you want when you’re cleaning a bedspread your child projectile-vomited over in the early hours of the morning.

“It’s a simple well thought-out, well-balanced laundry space.”

Quoting the judges’ notes, show host Mark Richardson said: “There was a consistent artisanal feel to the space and you thought a lot about everything. It was obvious you had a plan and you executed it well . . . yet again.”

Both judges scored it 9.5 out of 10.

Orange received 16.5 — the judges loving their colour, which Amy had helped them choose — Team Purple’s Chlo and Em also received 16.5 for their “lovely, fresh and pleasant space”; and Team Blue’s Ben and Tom got 13.5, with judge Kristina Rapley appreciating where they were going with their “industrial, minimalist, functional, practical, inoffensive” approach.

The room “redo” required each team to choose an area they felt needed improving.

Yellow selected the guest bedroom, which was first done up by Agni and Claire before Gizzy Hard won the first Room Reveal week and were given the option of exchanging houses with any other team.

They decided to take Orange’s corner Block house. They kept with the room’s original theme — “desert chic” — although this time the judges got the “desert” part.

“They’ve totally shown Claire and Agni how desert chic is done,” said Rapley.

Jason felt it was “a little sickly sweet” and the judges were polarised over a rug Bonham said was “hideous”. It reminded him of a bad version of the musical Joseph and the Technicolour Dreamcoast.

Rapley disagreed, saying it was “really cool” and “I think it works”.

“There were some brave choices made, especially with the colours,” Richardson read from the judges’ notes. “It’s a great room, it just needed a bit more white to freshen up the space a little.”

He revealed only Rapley’s score, 8.5, while Orange received 9 for a children’s room my 10-year-old son pointed out had “nothing kid-like in it”.

Purple scored 8 for a landing of which Bonham said “this is what they should have done the first time”.

Blue got 8 for their redone landing, along with a whole bunch of “thank-yous” from the judges for “listening to us”.

With $7000 on the line and Orange sniffing a victory, they were always going to play their game-changing points, despite Yellow having helped them out with their colour and styling.

It is, of course, a game after all and all appears fair in Block love and war.

Prior to the Reveal, teams were visited by family members and friends for a massive clean-up session.

Among Yellow’s was Stu’s boy Marshall, who showed the apple doesn’t fall too far from the tree.

“Everyone needs a shiny knob,” said Marshall as he polished a door knob.

“Stu Watts’ son, ladies and gentlemen,” said Amy.

Yellow also got a special visit from local MP and National Party deputy leader Paula Bennett, a self-confessed “Westie” and fan of Amy and Stu.

“Where is all the leopard print?” the MP asked.

“You don’t want to know where my leopard print is,” replied Stu.

And neither do we.

The judges love ’em. NZ Stuff hates ’em. But whatever the outcome of the The Block NZ 2018, we won’t forget ’em.

Gizzy Hard’s Amy Moore and Stu Watts once again did what they keep doing on the renovation reality TV series — impressing the judges at the weekly Room Reveal, this time the laundry and a “redo” of another area of their Hobsonville Point townhouse.

Whether that is good enough to add another victory to their collection will be answered tonight.

Last night’s episode, as predictably as a Stuff reviewer bagging Yellow’s Amy and Stu, left the TV audience up in the air.

The two minus-1 game-changing points Team Orange’s Claire and Agni have collected in recent weeks were jettisoned into play, both against Yellow after their laundry was scored close to perfect.

“A lovely space, very relaxing, very calm,” said judge Jason Bonham, which is exactly what you want when you’re cleaning a bedspread your child projectile-vomited over in the early hours of the morning.

“It’s a simple well thought-out, well-balanced laundry space.”

Quoting the judges’ notes, show host Mark Richardson said: “There was a consistent artisanal feel to the space and you thought a lot about everything. It was obvious you had a plan and you executed it well . . . yet again.”

Both judges scored it 9.5 out of 10.

Orange received 16.5 — the judges loving their colour, which Amy had helped them choose — Team Purple’s Chlo and Em also received 16.5 for their “lovely, fresh and pleasant space”; and Team Blue’s Ben and Tom got 13.5, with judge Kristina Rapley appreciating where they were going with their “industrial, minimalist, functional, practical, inoffensive” approach.

The room “redo” required each team to choose an area they felt needed improving.

Yellow selected the guest bedroom, which was first done up by Agni and Claire before Gizzy Hard won the first Room Reveal week and were given the option of exchanging houses with any other team.

They decided to take Orange’s corner Block house. They kept with the room’s original theme — “desert chic” — although this time the judges got the “desert” part.

“They’ve totally shown Claire and Agni how desert chic is done,” said Rapley.

Jason felt it was “a little sickly sweet” and the judges were polarised over a rug Bonham said was “hideous”. It reminded him of a bad version of the musical Joseph and the Technicolour Dreamcoast.

Rapley disagreed, saying it was “really cool” and “I think it works”.

“There were some brave choices made, especially with the colours,” Richardson read from the judges’ notes. “It’s a great room, it just needed a bit more white to freshen up the space a little.”

He revealed only Rapley’s score, 8.5, while Orange received 9 for a children’s room my 10-year-old son pointed out had “nothing kid-like in it”.

Purple scored 8 for a landing of which Bonham said “this is what they should have done the first time”.

Blue got 8 for their redone landing, along with a whole bunch of “thank-yous” from the judges for “listening to us”.

With $7000 on the line and Orange sniffing a victory, they were always going to play their game-changing points, despite Yellow having helped them out with their colour and styling.

It is, of course, a game after all and all appears fair in Block love and war.

Prior to the Reveal, teams were visited by family members and friends for a massive clean-up session.

Among Yellow’s was Stu’s boy Marshall, who showed the apple doesn’t fall too far from the tree.

“Everyone needs a shiny knob,” said Marshall as he polished a door knob.

“Stu Watts’ son, ladies and gentlemen,” said Amy.

Yellow also got a special visit from local MP and National Party deputy leader Paula Bennett, a self-confessed “Westie” and fan of Amy and Stu.

“Where is all the leopard print?” the MP asked.

“You don’t want to know where my leopard print is,” replied Stu.

And neither do we.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you agree with the Government’s new guideline for police, to not prosecute drug users when a therapeutic approach would be more beneficial or there is no public interest in prosecution?