Chance to air disability concerns

MAKING THEIR VOICES HEARD: CCS Disability Action is providing a platform for Tairawhiti whanau with a disability to have their say through a series of hui called Karanga Maha ki Tairawhiti. Attending the first hui were, from back left, Larni-Jean Porou, Dawn White, Walton Mathieson, Patricia Rofe and Katie Mackey. Front, Dorothy Taare-Smith, Pamela Crawford, Poihaere Taingahue and Hikihiki Morgan. Picture by Rebecca Grunwell.

CCS Disability Action is providing an opportunity for Tairawhiti Maori with a disability to have their say through a series of community hui (meeting) over the next few months.

The series is called Karanga Maha ki Tairawhiti, with three hui in total. The first hui was held earlier this month in Gisborne at The Emerald Hotel, with the next in October, and the third hui is scheduled for December.

Karanga Maha is a forum for whanau, or families, with a disability or impairment to have their say pertaining to the gaps in our community, relating to disability service provision. CCS Disability Action Te Pou Whirinaki leader for Tairawhiti/Hawkes Bay Dorothy Taare-Smith said the series of hui provide a platform for voices that are often marginalised.

“Karanga Maha acknowledges that the needs of Maori are not always met, because their voice is not always heard. Karanga Maha gives the people a voice.

“Many Maori disengage with disability support services because their needs are not heard, and as a result they are disadvantaged.

“Some become cut off from their culture, or they are forced to go through processes that are not in line with their cultural needs and wellbeing.

“Karanga Maha is designed to empower the people because we want to see Maori with a disability taking leadership in their own lives, in their communities.

“They face the same social and economic challenges that the rest of the Maori population face, as well as having to work through the barriers that all people with a disability in Aotearoa go through.

The first hui was focused on getting feedback about whether or not cultural needs are being met.

“We want our whanau to be shaping the service delivery to ensure it’s done in a way that is culturally appropriate for them,” said Mrs Taare-Smith.

One of the main themes that arose out of the hui was around providing for whanau who live in rural areas.

It was a theme pertinent to Tairawhiti, because of the layout of the region, said Mrs Taare-Smith.

“We have many whanau in Tairawhiti who find it difficult to access services or support, because they live in rural areas.”

Navigating the system and finding employment were also major themes.

“Most families don’t know how to access services or wouldn’t know where to start.

“They are also having difficulties in finding work in our local community. Some employers are not willing to employ someone who has a disability.”

CCS Disability Action is providing an opportunity for Tairawhiti Maori with a disability to have their say through a series of community hui (meeting) over the next few months.

The series is called Karanga Maha ki Tairawhiti, with three hui in total. The first hui was held earlier this month in Gisborne at The Emerald Hotel, with the next in October, and the third hui is scheduled for December.

Karanga Maha is a forum for whanau, or families, with a disability or impairment to have their say pertaining to the gaps in our community, relating to disability service provision. CCS Disability Action Te Pou Whirinaki leader for Tairawhiti/Hawkes Bay Dorothy Taare-Smith said the series of hui provide a platform for voices that are often marginalised.

“Karanga Maha acknowledges that the needs of Maori are not always met, because their voice is not always heard. Karanga Maha gives the people a voice.

“Many Maori disengage with disability support services because their needs are not heard, and as a result they are disadvantaged.

“Some become cut off from their culture, or they are forced to go through processes that are not in line with their cultural needs and wellbeing.

“Karanga Maha is designed to empower the people because we want to see Maori with a disability taking leadership in their own lives, in their communities.

“They face the same social and economic challenges that the rest of the Maori population face, as well as having to work through the barriers that all people with a disability in Aotearoa go through.

The first hui was focused on getting feedback about whether or not cultural needs are being met.

“We want our whanau to be shaping the service delivery to ensure it’s done in a way that is culturally appropriate for them,” said Mrs Taare-Smith.

One of the main themes that arose out of the hui was around providing for whanau who live in rural areas.

It was a theme pertinent to Tairawhiti, because of the layout of the region, said Mrs Taare-Smith.

“We have many whanau in Tairawhiti who find it difficult to access services or support, because they live in rural areas.”

Navigating the system and finding employment were also major themes.

“Most families don’t know how to access services or wouldn’t know where to start.

“They are also having difficulties in finding work in our local community. Some employers are not willing to employ someone who has a disability.”

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