A final tear and goodbye . . . so now it’s off to the auction

The last time I spoke to Stu Watts, he was standing in front of my toilet.

When I told his Gizzy Hard partner Amy Moore this, she asked if it was at a party.

Nah. Plumber Stu was there to fix my loo and after he raised an eyebrow and recommended I seriously consider upgrading in the near future, I left him to it.

It’s still going. So thanks, “boi”. You’re a top rooster.

Last night Stu and his incredibly-talented Yellow Team partner ended The Block NZ 2018 renovation reality TV series as they started it. Victorious.

They made it a Block record-equalling seventh Room Reveal win — this one for the backyard area of their Hobsonville Point townhouse which, along with those of their three Block rivals, go to auction live on TV3 this Sunday night.

Tears were shed as Yellow farewelled House No.4 — 12 intense weeks after arriving at the site with huge aspirations but little idea of the dramas that were to ensue.

Reality TV, as Block host Mark Richardson admitted, is all about the human factor. And in Amy and Stu, they had two colourful personalities that were always going to provide fuel for the entertainment fire — whether it be controversial, comedic or, as Stu regularly delivered, Coastie.

They made this show. Not only was their combination, allied with builder Dave “not Burgess” Wallace, clearly a cut above the others when it came to teamwork, planning, focus and experience, they brought with it characteristics that endeared them to many outside and a fair few in the big centres. Which is why they are certainties to win the People’s Choice Award.

Most important, though, was their talent. Amy was consistently lauded by the judges for her styling, her ability to week after week produce something aesthetically special. And last night was no different.

“Her styling is just so good,” said judge Kristina Rapley.

A self-confessed “Blockaholic”, Amy revealed earlier in the series that she had everything pretty much formulated. Playing it by ear never entered Yellow’s game plan.

They made changes, for sure, and there were moments of indecision, but they were almost always in, or somewhere near, control.

Stu was the perfect foil. The workhorse with the skills to go along with it. Get the job done. Move on to the next. And while his one-liners, expletives and take-it-or-leave-it character might have irked the odd over-sensitive viewer, Facebooker and pretentious NZ Stuff reviewer, that was him. No frills. No BS.

Last night’s Room Reveal ended up a straight-up contest for the $5000 cash prize, courtesy of a deal between Yellow and Purple’s Chlo and Em.

Knowing they were once again going to be the target of game-changing tactics and likely alliances, Amy and Stu agreed to give Purple $4000 for a minus-2 the girls won in a competition earlier in the week.

Yellow were sitting on nine points from one of the two judges (Jason Bonham) and subsequently played the minus-2 against Team Blue’s Ben and Tom, who were on eight.

Team Orange’s Agni had spilled the beans on him, giving Blue an “undo” they could use to neutralise the minus-2. Tom indicated they didn’t bring it with them, then produced it — a game-playing deception for which Stu gave them credit . . . “we got played”.

It didn’t matter. Yellow won with 17.5 points to Blue’s 16.5. The girls were the big winners but if Yellow had not accepted Purple’s offer, they would have walked away with nothing. Instead, they added $1000 to their coffers.

Judges Bonham and Kristina Rapley once again hailed Yellow for producing an area that ticked every box and, as Rapley put it, had “character, soul and heart”.

Hopefully, the buyers will appreciate that. It is a near-certainty Yellow’s house will go under the hammer first after Blue Team won the final challenge and with it the right to decide the order of house auctions.

Blue will confirm that order the day of the auction when, as Richardson put it, the real judging happens — when the teams bank whatever their house goes for over its reserve price and the winning team collect the grand prize of $100,000.

The final “tools down” call of the 2018 series was emotional for all four teams.

Yellow, in their own words, “smashed it” and produced “a smack job”.

“It was a hard slog but worth every minute,” said Amy, before getting into their car with a box of Steinies on her lap.

On Sunday night, it could be champagne.

  • History does repeat. For the second time, I referred to ace Yellow Team builder Dave Wallace as Dave Burgess (yesterday’s Block story) — the husband of me old Elgin School classmate Annette. Call it a mental, errr, block after nearly 50 stories — more words than a vat full of jellybeans. Beersies on me my breatha Dave (Wallace, that is).

One more thing. Stu’s cult-like status was reaffirmed by my neighbour’s 10-year-old boy, who received a Stu Watts autograph on his arm a few days ago and hasn’t washed it since. The boy said it was just like the time his surfing-loving mum didn’t want to wash her hand after touching Kelly Slater. Golden.

The last time I spoke to Stu Watts, he was standing in front of my toilet.

When I told his Gizzy Hard partner Amy Moore this, she asked if it was at a party.

Nah. Plumber Stu was there to fix my loo and after he raised an eyebrow and recommended I seriously consider upgrading in the near future, I left him to it.

It’s still going. So thanks, “boi”. You’re a top rooster.

Last night Stu and his incredibly-talented Yellow Team partner ended The Block NZ 2018 renovation reality TV series as they started it. Victorious.

They made it a Block record-equalling seventh Room Reveal win — this one for the backyard area of their Hobsonville Point townhouse which, along with those of their three Block rivals, go to auction live on TV3 this Sunday night.

Tears were shed as Yellow farewelled House No.4 — 12 intense weeks after arriving at the site with huge aspirations but little idea of the dramas that were to ensue.

Reality TV, as Block host Mark Richardson admitted, is all about the human factor. And in Amy and Stu, they had two colourful personalities that were always going to provide fuel for the entertainment fire — whether it be controversial, comedic or, as Stu regularly delivered, Coastie.

They made this show. Not only was their combination, allied with builder Dave “not Burgess” Wallace, clearly a cut above the others when it came to teamwork, planning, focus and experience, they brought with it characteristics that endeared them to many outside and a fair few in the big centres. Which is why they are certainties to win the People’s Choice Award.

Most important, though, was their talent. Amy was consistently lauded by the judges for her styling, her ability to week after week produce something aesthetically special. And last night was no different.

“Her styling is just so good,” said judge Kristina Rapley.

A self-confessed “Blockaholic”, Amy revealed earlier in the series that she had everything pretty much formulated. Playing it by ear never entered Yellow’s game plan.

They made changes, for sure, and there were moments of indecision, but they were almost always in, or somewhere near, control.

Stu was the perfect foil. The workhorse with the skills to go along with it. Get the job done. Move on to the next. And while his one-liners, expletives and take-it-or-leave-it character might have irked the odd over-sensitive viewer, Facebooker and pretentious NZ Stuff reviewer, that was him. No frills. No BS.

Last night’s Room Reveal ended up a straight-up contest for the $5000 cash prize, courtesy of a deal between Yellow and Purple’s Chlo and Em.

Knowing they were once again going to be the target of game-changing tactics and likely alliances, Amy and Stu agreed to give Purple $4000 for a minus-2 the girls won in a competition earlier in the week.

Yellow were sitting on nine points from one of the two judges (Jason Bonham) and subsequently played the minus-2 against Team Blue’s Ben and Tom, who were on eight.

Team Orange’s Agni had spilled the beans on him, giving Blue an “undo” they could use to neutralise the minus-2. Tom indicated they didn’t bring it with them, then produced it — a game-playing deception for which Stu gave them credit . . . “we got played”.

It didn’t matter. Yellow won with 17.5 points to Blue’s 16.5. The girls were the big winners but if Yellow had not accepted Purple’s offer, they would have walked away with nothing. Instead, they added $1000 to their coffers.

Judges Bonham and Kristina Rapley once again hailed Yellow for producing an area that ticked every box and, as Rapley put it, had “character, soul and heart”.

Hopefully, the buyers will appreciate that. It is a near-certainty Yellow’s house will go under the hammer first after Blue Team won the final challenge and with it the right to decide the order of house auctions.

Blue will confirm that order the day of the auction when, as Richardson put it, the real judging happens — when the teams bank whatever their house goes for over its reserve price and the winning team collect the grand prize of $100,000.

The final “tools down” call of the 2018 series was emotional for all four teams.

Yellow, in their own words, “smashed it” and produced “a smack job”.

“It was a hard slog but worth every minute,” said Amy, before getting into their car with a box of Steinies on her lap.

On Sunday night, it could be champagne.

  • History does repeat. For the second time, I referred to ace Yellow Team builder Dave Wallace as Dave Burgess (yesterday’s Block story) — the husband of me old Elgin School classmate Annette. Call it a mental, errr, block after nearly 50 stories — more words than a vat full of jellybeans. Beersies on me my breatha Dave (Wallace, that is).

One more thing. Stu’s cult-like status was reaffirmed by my neighbour’s 10-year-old boy, who received a Stu Watts autograph on his arm a few days ago and hasn’t washed it since. The boy said it was just like the time his surfing-loving mum didn’t want to wash her hand after touching Kelly Slater. Golden.

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