Bond is raised for car rally road usage here

An increased bond of $50,000 will be required from organisers of the Silver Fern Rally to protect roads here from any damage they could cause.

The Future Tairawhiti committee has supported the decision to close seven public roads when the rally comes to town at the end of November, and increase the bond usually required by the organisers.

The Silver Fern Rally is a long-distance motor sport event around New Zealand over a week.

Ultimate Rally Group manager Victoria Main said the event would bring around 500 visitors to the region, as well as the 45 teams taking part.

Organisers have always paid a bond of $20,000 for any damage to council assets like bridges and signs.

District councillors agreed to increase the bond to $50,000 because of potential damage to roads already battered by floods in June.

This year the rally will start in Hamilton on November 23 and finish in Rotorua on December 1.

It will drive through the Tairawhiti region on November 30 and December 1 as the last leg.

Pehiri, Wharekopae, Tahora, Rakauroa, Ruakaka, Parikanapa and Taumata Roads will all be closed to the public during the event.

An application to close Tarewa Road was declined because the road is already closed to the public since it was heavily damaged in the Queen’s Birthday floods about four months ago.

Mayor Meng Foon said national television coverage of this event would be positive for the region.

“Money can’t buy the helicopter flying above and the commentary about what a beautiful place this is.”

Tairawhiti Roads general manager Dave Hadfield said the rally had done damage to the roads last time. Organisers were shown photos of the damage and the costs were paid.

Heavy metal had been planned to go on the roads the rally would drive over in the next six weeks.

It was discussed whether this should be postponed until after the rally because the cars could damage the newly-metalled roads.

If the heavy metal was put off being laid until after the event, it could mean a further wait of four or five months because metal could not be put down once roads had dried out over summer.

Councillors Shannon Dowsing and Graham Thompson felt the metal should go down as planned before the rally.

Otherwise it could be April or May before the next construction period began.

“If they cause damage to newly-metalled roads then they should pay,” said Mr Dowsing.

An increased bond of $50,000 will be required from organisers of the Silver Fern Rally to protect roads here from any damage they could cause.

The Future Tairawhiti committee has supported the decision to close seven public roads when the rally comes to town at the end of November, and increase the bond usually required by the organisers.

The Silver Fern Rally is a long-distance motor sport event around New Zealand over a week.

Ultimate Rally Group manager Victoria Main said the event would bring around 500 visitors to the region, as well as the 45 teams taking part.

Organisers have always paid a bond of $20,000 for any damage to council assets like bridges and signs.

District councillors agreed to increase the bond to $50,000 because of potential damage to roads already battered by floods in June.

This year the rally will start in Hamilton on November 23 and finish in Rotorua on December 1.

It will drive through the Tairawhiti region on November 30 and December 1 as the last leg.

Pehiri, Wharekopae, Tahora, Rakauroa, Ruakaka, Parikanapa and Taumata Roads will all be closed to the public during the event.

An application to close Tarewa Road was declined because the road is already closed to the public since it was heavily damaged in the Queen’s Birthday floods about four months ago.

Mayor Meng Foon said national television coverage of this event would be positive for the region.

“Money can’t buy the helicopter flying above and the commentary about what a beautiful place this is.”

Tairawhiti Roads general manager Dave Hadfield said the rally had done damage to the roads last time. Organisers were shown photos of the damage and the costs were paid.

Heavy metal had been planned to go on the roads the rally would drive over in the next six weeks.

It was discussed whether this should be postponed until after the rally because the cars could damage the newly-metalled roads.

If the heavy metal was put off being laid until after the event, it could mean a further wait of four or five months because metal could not be put down once roads had dried out over summer.

Councillors Shannon Dowsing and Graham Thompson felt the metal should go down as planned before the rally.

Otherwise it could be April or May before the next construction period began.

“If they cause damage to newly-metalled roads then they should pay,” said Mr Dowsing.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you agree with the call from Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones for Gisborne to be developed as a wood-processing hub?