Bay name alteration confirmed

Turanganui a Kiwa/Poverty Bay.

Turanganui a Kiwa/Poverty Bay.

The New Zealand Geographic Board Nga Pou Taunaha o Aotearoa has confirmed the proposal to change the name of Poverty Bay to a dual name, Turanganui a Kiwa/Poverty Bay.

More than 600 submissions were made about the proposal between May 24 and August 24, after the board accepted the dual name proposal from Gisborne District Council.

Board acting chairman Anselm Haanen said 609 submissions were received, with a quarter clearly supporting the proposal.

A quarter of the submissions preferred just “Poverty Bay” and a quarter preferred just “Turanganui a- Kiwa”.

The remaining submissions offered ambiguous support or were neutral.

Mr Haanen said the board considered the reasons provided by submitters, recognising the heritage and significance of both names, which was why a dual name offered the best solution.

Captain James Cook named Poverty Bay when he landed here in 1769 and was unable to re-supply his ship.

Turanganui-a-Kiwa means “the great or long-standing place of Kiwa”.

“This name has been documented since about 1830 as the name for the bay, but its use has been much longer in oral tradition,” Mr Haanen said.

The board will prepare a report for Land Information Minister Eugenie Sage, who will make the final decision.

The New Zealand Geographic Board Nga Pou Taunaha o Aotearoa has confirmed the proposal to change the name of Poverty Bay to a dual name, Turanganui a Kiwa/Poverty Bay.

More than 600 submissions were made about the proposal between May 24 and August 24, after the board accepted the dual name proposal from Gisborne District Council.

Board acting chairman Anselm Haanen said 609 submissions were received, with a quarter clearly supporting the proposal.

A quarter of the submissions preferred just “Poverty Bay” and a quarter preferred just “Turanganui a- Kiwa”.

The remaining submissions offered ambiguous support or were neutral.

Mr Haanen said the board considered the reasons provided by submitters, recognising the heritage and significance of both names, which was why a dual name offered the best solution.

Captain James Cook named Poverty Bay when he landed here in 1769 and was unable to re-supply his ship.

Turanganui-a-Kiwa means “the great or long-standing place of Kiwa”.

“This name has been documented since about 1830 as the name for the bay, but its use has been much longer in oral tradition,” Mr Haanen said.

The board will prepare a report for Land Information Minister Eugenie Sage, who will make the final decision.

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Te Hamua Nikora - 10 months ago
I will never EVER use the curse of poverty upon my home, EVER AGAIN

Turanganui-a-Kiwa ALONE is what it has ALWAYS been to me, and that it shall stay.

Thanks for the "official change", but it doesn't go far enough, so I will!

Ian Graham - 10 months ago
Very hard for me to believe that one half of the submissions were ambiguous or neutral from people who would have taken the time to make a submission. Very suspicious interruption.

Arapeta Gibson - 10 months ago
"Very suspicious interruption" . . . I'm not sure what your point is. Are you suggesting that the chairperson of the board is lying? I don't know what your basis is for this, other than showing a deliberate bias against the outcome.
This is truly a significant shift towards all our history being heard and understood. I'm patient, I have no doubt that more and more of our stories from before Cook will become common knowledge, and all our community will be better informed of our history. There was a lifestyle and an economy here already when Cook arrived.

Heneriata Paringatai, Melbourne - 10 months ago
Would have preferred Turanganui-a-Kiwa on its own. But that's a great start.

Bobby Howard, Rotorua - 10 months ago
I have never referred to Poverty Bay as a name for my hometown. Turanga nui a kiwa should be the name on its own. Think about it folks, why do you think those cities in the Bay of Plenty seem more prosperous?

Horiana Whata - 10 months ago
Yass . . . would have preferred Turanganui-a-Kiwa on its own . . . engari, Maori name first xx

Donna Harris - 10 months ago
We have a thriving community here. A name does not stop people from achieving or not achieving. That is up to the individual, not the name of where they live.

Michelle Ahern - 10 months ago
Great to see the true name of the region being formally recognised! Would like to see the rest of the country follow this example. Fantastic!

Iwa Manuel, Paremata - 10 months ago
1. Who are these names making decisions?
Theirs are just as foreign as Captain Cook's - who was only a visitor to New Zealand.
Why should our people have to go through a process of verifying who's who when Cook was allowed to give our place such a belittling name?
2. Why could he not resupply his tug boat? Was it because we didn't have the luxuries of England?
Cook did not have any rights or recognition to say anything.
Poverty Bay? This name should never have come about.

Margaret Cameron-Ash - 10 months ago
As stated in my book "Lying for the Admiralty" (Rosenberg, Sydney, 2018), Cook initially bestowed the name of Endeavour Bay as a memorial of their first landing place in New Zealand.

Leith - 10 months ago
Tautoko that Te Hamua Nikora xxx

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