Year of conversations launched

Tuia 250. File picture
Archbishop Donald Tamihere.

Events throughout the weekend that centred on the first meetings between Maori and European with the arrival of British explorer James Cook, launched what the Te Ha 2019 Sestercentennial Trust hopes will become a year long wananga (educational forum).

The wananga is envisioned as a programme of conversations and exchanges within the community.

The programme of events was designed to be accessible for all, said Te Ha general manager Glenis Philip-Barbara. Those events included the opening of the Te Ha Art Awards exhibition on Friday, a Tipuna Stories gathering at the HB Williams Memorial Library on Saturday, and a talk about two navigational traditions during a sailing into the bay.

“We saw families gather at the library to enjoy the Tipuna Stories with the team from Te Runanga o Turanganui a Kiwa, who presented the story of the Horouta waka and its arrival in the 1350s,” said Ms Philip-Barbara.

“On board the MV Takitimu, they paused on the spot where the Endeavour anchored in 1769, and heard from local historians Joe Martin and Anne McGuire the story of those first encounters between Cook and his crew and tangata whenua — all in the context of 1000 years of navigating history.”

On Saturday night Toihoukura Maori visual arts and design associate professor Steve Gibbs and Pacific anthropologist Dame Anne Salmond talked about taonga from this region that are held in two London exhibitions that explore early Pacific encounters.

Dr Wayne Ngata and Dame Anne joined director Lala Rolls for a public viewing and discussion about the documentary Tupaia’s Endeavour.

Waka hourua (twin-hulled voyaging canoe) Tairawhiti welcomed hundreds of visitors for tours and sailings over the two days, while yesterday afternoon Historic Places Tairawhiti hosted the First Meetings Korero at which nine speakers addressed this year’s theme “what can we learn from the October 1769 meetings?”

At dawn today people gathered at Waikanae to share karakia (prayers) for a shared future based on mutual respect.

The Te Ha Trust’s newly-branded Tuia 250 ki Turanga programme, that aims to present events designed to explore the multiple histories of this region, offered a combination of experiences unique to Tairawhiti, said Ms Philip-Barbara.

“We look forward to sharing more stories, perspectives and experiences in a way that is uniquely ours, as we head toward 2019 and the future.”

Events throughout the weekend that centred on the first meetings between Maori and European with the arrival of British explorer James Cook, launched what the Te Ha 2019 Sestercentennial Trust hopes will become a year long wananga (educational forum).

The wananga is envisioned as a programme of conversations and exchanges within the community.

The programme of events was designed to be accessible for all, said Te Ha general manager Glenis Philip-Barbara. Those events included the opening of the Te Ha Art Awards exhibition on Friday, a Tipuna Stories gathering at the HB Williams Memorial Library on Saturday, and a talk about two navigational traditions during a sailing into the bay.

“We saw families gather at the library to enjoy the Tipuna Stories with the team from Te Runanga o Turanganui a Kiwa, who presented the story of the Horouta waka and its arrival in the 1350s,” said Ms Philip-Barbara.

“On board the MV Takitimu, they paused on the spot where the Endeavour anchored in 1769, and heard from local historians Joe Martin and Anne McGuire the story of those first encounters between Cook and his crew and tangata whenua — all in the context of 1000 years of navigating history.”

On Saturday night Toihoukura Maori visual arts and design associate professor Steve Gibbs and Pacific anthropologist Dame Anne Salmond talked about taonga from this region that are held in two London exhibitions that explore early Pacific encounters.

Dr Wayne Ngata and Dame Anne joined director Lala Rolls for a public viewing and discussion about the documentary Tupaia’s Endeavour.

Waka hourua (twin-hulled voyaging canoe) Tairawhiti welcomed hundreds of visitors for tours and sailings over the two days, while yesterday afternoon Historic Places Tairawhiti hosted the First Meetings Korero at which nine speakers addressed this year’s theme “what can we learn from the October 1769 meetings?”

At dawn today people gathered at Waikanae to share karakia (prayers) for a shared future based on mutual respect.

The Te Ha Trust’s newly-branded Tuia 250 ki Turanga programme, that aims to present events designed to explore the multiple histories of this region, offered a combination of experiences unique to Tairawhiti, said Ms Philip-Barbara.

“We look forward to sharing more stories, perspectives and experiences in a way that is uniquely ours, as we head toward 2019 and the future.”

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