Skills tuition on Restart a Heart day

RESTARTING HEARTS: Campion College students were given hands-on tuition in CPR and the use of an AED yesterday when St John staged part of its Restart a Heart Day campaign here. From left are St John’s Norma Lane, Campion’s Zoe Solomon and Sam Ma, St John’s Duncan Chisholm, firefighter Christian Evans, St John’s Diana Gray, Campion’s Luk Stoltz, St John’s Kirsten Leak and Campion’s Taylan Barber. Picture by Rebecca Grunwell

St John ran their nationwide Restart a Heart Day yesterday in Gisborne, with CPR and automated external defribrillator (AED) training at Campion College.

St John national director of clinical operations Norma Lane said it was a big success.

Some 200 students were taught by a team of 15 St John and Fire and Emergency NZ staff in two teaching sessions.

“Gisborne was chosen as one place to host the day because it’s the first place to see the sunrise every day,” Ms Lane said.

“What we taught them seemed to stick and some of them were fantastic at cardiopulmonary rescuscitation (CPR).

“They now know what’s important when it comes to effective CPR. They’ve been hands on.

“Some could produce 98 out of 100 efficiency, which is absolutely outstanding.”

Campion College bought an AED defibrillator unit and the students also received tuition in its use.

“It’s great the school now has an AED and the students know they have a ‘shock box’ in the school,” Ms Lane said.

The Herald spoke to some of them.

“It has made me feel more confident to save someone’s life if I see them collapse,” said 11-year-old Taylan Barber.

Luk Stoltz, 12, also said it had helped him feel more confident.

“I found it quite good. There will have been some people who would not have been able to save someone, even if they tried.”

Zoe Solomon, 12, said she felt really good about the “life” skills learned.

“CPR was semi-difficult to do. It was hard to push down. But it’s good to have learned how to to do it.”

St John medical director Dr Tony Smith said the aim was to educate the public on CPR and AEDs to improve New Zealanders’ chances of surviving cardiac arrest.

Teaching sessions like the one at Campion were also held in Auckland and Christchurch.

“Only one in 10 New Zealanders survives cardiac arrest, a statistic that emergency services say can be dramatically improved with bystander CPR and a shock from an AED.

“Early intervention with CPR combined with defibrillation can more than double someone’s chances of surviving a cardiac arrest,” Dr Smith said.

• In a separate initiative linked to the Restart a Heart theme, Turanga Health will present AEDs to marae throughout Gisborne.

For more information on Restart a Heart, go to http://www.restartaheart.co.nz

St John ran their nationwide Restart a Heart Day yesterday in Gisborne, with CPR and automated external defribrillator (AED) training at Campion College.

St John national director of clinical operations Norma Lane said it was a big success.

Some 200 students were taught by a team of 15 St John and Fire and Emergency NZ staff in two teaching sessions.

“Gisborne was chosen as one place to host the day because it’s the first place to see the sunrise every day,” Ms Lane said.

“What we taught them seemed to stick and some of them were fantastic at cardiopulmonary rescuscitation (CPR).

“They now know what’s important when it comes to effective CPR. They’ve been hands on.

“Some could produce 98 out of 100 efficiency, which is absolutely outstanding.”

Campion College bought an AED defibrillator unit and the students also received tuition in its use.

“It’s great the school now has an AED and the students know they have a ‘shock box’ in the school,” Ms Lane said.

The Herald spoke to some of them.

“It has made me feel more confident to save someone’s life if I see them collapse,” said 11-year-old Taylan Barber.

Luk Stoltz, 12, also said it had helped him feel more confident.

“I found it quite good. There will have been some people who would not have been able to save someone, even if they tried.”

Zoe Solomon, 12, said she felt really good about the “life” skills learned.

“CPR was semi-difficult to do. It was hard to push down. But it’s good to have learned how to to do it.”

St John medical director Dr Tony Smith said the aim was to educate the public on CPR and AEDs to improve New Zealanders’ chances of surviving cardiac arrest.

Teaching sessions like the one at Campion were also held in Auckland and Christchurch.

“Only one in 10 New Zealanders survives cardiac arrest, a statistic that emergency services say can be dramatically improved with bystander CPR and a shock from an AED.

“Early intervention with CPR combined with defibrillation can more than double someone’s chances of surviving a cardiac arrest,” Dr Smith said.

• In a separate initiative linked to the Restart a Heart theme, Turanga Health will present AEDs to marae throughout Gisborne.

For more information on Restart a Heart, go to http://www.restartaheart.co.nz

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