Thumbs up, mostly, for city art arrivals

But 20 percent give new murals the thumbs down.

But 20 percent give new murals the thumbs down.

Lowe St mural.
OCEAN HEALTH: A broken whale with red and blue sections seems to float with a 3D effect on the Te Rau Press building in Swiss duo Nevercrew’s mural.
Detroit artist Ouizi is known for her botanical-themed street art, as seen in this underwater world of sea organisms in her Centennial Marine Drive mural.
Seawalls Murals - Artist: Erena Koopu. Location: 115 Bright St
The image of a blue whale dominates a Grey Street carpark mural created by Toihoukura, Maori visual arts school students Te Arepa Teki, Duane Ngawaka and Nolan Maru.
Assisted by Tamara Whenuaroa, Nick Tupara’s stylised shark encountered by the outline of a swimming figure features in his mural in progress in Hardy Lane.
Picture by Paul Rickard
Rich imagery features in Wellington graphic artist Sean Duffell’s large-scale works such as his mural-in-progress in Kahutia Street.

Gisborne artist Leah McCann’s love of bright colour shines in her Bright Street carpark mural. Light blue dominates the work in which an orange coral tree is surrounded by an abstracted urban landscape.

Gisborne's new murals have received the thumbs-up from The Gisborne Herald online poll respondents.

An overwhelming 65 percent (185 of 286 participants) said the murals were good while 20 percent (56) said they were bad and 12 percent (45) said they were indifferent and had misgivings.

Most “good” respondents believed the murals brightened up the city.

Such comments included:

  • “Absolutely fabulous.”
  • “Better than graffiti and tourists like them.”
  • “It’s great to have more art around the place.”
  • “That certainly brightened the city up in a couple of days. Well done.”
  • “Gives Gisborne more interest for sightseers.”
  • “I love them! The talent is amazing, the message they spread is great and they liven up the place.”
  • “They’re the best thing that has happened for a long time!”
  • “They look great! What a cool way of showcasing the incredible talent and diversity in our community.”
  • “We need more!”
  • “Great start. Utilise some of the amazing talent from the world’s best school of contemporary art Toihoukura.”
  • “At last, something not controversial.”

But not all ‘‘good” respondents agreed with the above sentiment.

  • “As long as everything isn’t adorned with the koru. Does everything have to be Maori? No.”
  • “One of Captain Cook and his merry sailors around the old Watties building in Awapuni Road or Customhouse Street would be perfect.”

The “bad’’ comments included:

  • “Cheap and nasty.”
  • “Where was public consultation before city art space was handed over? Ocean health sounds convincing but too many of these huge images shoved in our face reflect nothing of Gisborne.”
  • “More meaningless Maori scribbles. What approval was given for the choice of topic and by whom?”
  • “The art has its place but the protest message is overstated.”
  • “Seeing sliced-up creatures does not contribute to a good day in town.”
  • “Very sad to see these animals in pieces.”

The “indifferent’’ comments included:

  • “Some are technically clever but the ocean health theme is invisible in others.
  • The huge scary face in Lowe Street is way over the top.”
  • “Consultation? Pfft . . .”
  • “Will they have the same fate as the historic murals of the late Graeme Mudge and be allowed to deteriorate and fade?”

Gisborne's new murals have received the thumbs-up from The Gisborne Herald online poll respondents.

An overwhelming 65 percent (185 of 286 participants) said the murals were good while 20 percent (56) said they were bad and 12 percent (45) said they were indifferent and had misgivings.

Most “good” respondents believed the murals brightened up the city.

Such comments included:

  • “Absolutely fabulous.”
  • “Better than graffiti and tourists like them.”
  • “It’s great to have more art around the place.”
  • “That certainly brightened the city up in a couple of days. Well done.”
  • “Gives Gisborne more interest for sightseers.”
  • “I love them! The talent is amazing, the message they spread is great and they liven up the place.”
  • “They’re the best thing that has happened for a long time!”
  • “They look great! What a cool way of showcasing the incredible talent and diversity in our community.”
  • “We need more!”
  • “Great start. Utilise some of the amazing talent from the world’s best school of contemporary art Toihoukura.”
  • “At last, something not controversial.”

But not all ‘‘good” respondents agreed with the above sentiment.

  • “As long as everything isn’t adorned with the koru. Does everything have to be Maori? No.”
  • “One of Captain Cook and his merry sailors around the old Watties building in Awapuni Road or Customhouse Street would be perfect.”

The “bad’’ comments included:

  • “Cheap and nasty.”
  • “Where was public consultation before city art space was handed over? Ocean health sounds convincing but too many of these huge images shoved in our face reflect nothing of Gisborne.”
  • “More meaningless Maori scribbles. What approval was given for the choice of topic and by whom?”
  • “The art has its place but the protest message is overstated.”
  • “Seeing sliced-up creatures does not contribute to a good day in town.”
  • “Very sad to see these animals in pieces.”

The “indifferent’’ comments included:

  • “Some are technically clever but the ocean health theme is invisible in others.
  • The huge scary face in Lowe Street is way over the top.”
  • “Consultation? Pfft . . .”
  • “Will they have the same fate as the historic murals of the late Graeme Mudge and be allowed to deteriorate and fade?”

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Horiana Jahnke, Australia - 25 days ago
Fantastic .. great to see wall space put to good use. Looking forward to seeing these when I come home next.

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