Local iwi in biosecurity awards

Rongowhakaata iwi and Ngati Ruapani ki Turanga iwi are among the finalists of tonight’s New Zealand Biosecurity Awards 2018 in Auckland.

The national awards, which are an initiative of the Ministry of Primary Industries, recognise and celebrate outstanding contributions to New Zealand’s biosecurity — in communities, businesses, iwi and hapu, government, in the bush, and in backyards.

There are 19 finalists in the awards’ seven categories.

The local iwi groups are one of three finalists in the Biological Heritage Challenge Science Award.

Rongowhakaata and Ngati Ruapani are working in collaboration with Plant and Food Research, Auckland Council, Te Tira Whakamaataki and Biological Heritage National Science Challenge.

The group’s award entry is under Dr Nick Waipara — Te Taura e Herea Nei te Putaiao me Te Ao Maori; Science Excellence in Biosecurity.

Over the last decade, the name Dr Nick Waipara has become synonymous with kauri dieback.

He is of Rongowhakaata and Ngati Ruapani descent and through his various roles with Plant and Food Research, Auckland Council, Te Tira Whakamaataki and the Biological Heritage National Science Challenge, he has continuously advocated for science informing biosecurity policy.

Dr Waipara has also advocated to incorporate matauranga Maori (Maori knowledge) into scientific approaches to biosecurity threats, and involve mana whenua to help deal with biosecurity threats such as kauri dieback.

Rongowhakaata iwi and Ngati Ruapani ki Turanga iwi are among the finalists of tonight’s New Zealand Biosecurity Awards 2018 in Auckland.

The national awards, which are an initiative of the Ministry of Primary Industries, recognise and celebrate outstanding contributions to New Zealand’s biosecurity — in communities, businesses, iwi and hapu, government, in the bush, and in backyards.

There are 19 finalists in the awards’ seven categories.

The local iwi groups are one of three finalists in the Biological Heritage Challenge Science Award.

Rongowhakaata and Ngati Ruapani are working in collaboration with Plant and Food Research, Auckland Council, Te Tira Whakamaataki and Biological Heritage National Science Challenge.

The group’s award entry is under Dr Nick Waipara — Te Taura e Herea Nei te Putaiao me Te Ao Maori; Science Excellence in Biosecurity.

Over the last decade, the name Dr Nick Waipara has become synonymous with kauri dieback.

He is of Rongowhakaata and Ngati Ruapani descent and through his various roles with Plant and Food Research, Auckland Council, Te Tira Whakamaataki and the Biological Heritage National Science Challenge, he has continuously advocated for science informing biosecurity policy.

Dr Waipara has also advocated to incorporate matauranga Maori (Maori knowledge) into scientific approaches to biosecurity threats, and involve mana whenua to help deal with biosecurity threats such as kauri dieback.

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